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10 August 2020 16:43

A-level results day 2020

Date when exam results come out this year - and how grades are assessed

STUDENTS in England, Wales and Northern Ireland will receive their A-level and GCSE results shortly. This year has been different from all points of view for teachers and students, because due to the coronavirus pandemic all exams were cancelled. 2 A-level results will be revealed on Thursday, August 13 Credit: Getty Images - Getty Despite no exams in 2020, students will still receive a grade based upon teacher's predictions. August 13 - England, Wales and Northern Ireland's A-level and AS-level results and A-level equivalent technical qualifications like BTECs and Cambridge Nationals. August 20 - GCSE results in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and GCSE equivalent technical qualifications Students will find out their results by attending schools from 8am, receiving an email or logging into an online portal.

The Government has said teachers can invite pupils into school to collect results, as long as it happens in a Covid-safe way. Most read in News MASKING THE TRUTH Some face coverings make risk of virus infection WORSE, scientists find LOCKDOWN TRACKER Postcode checker tells you lockdown restrictions in YOUR area CON VAN SMASH Prison van transporting lag crashes with HGV leaving four people trapped HOT SPOTS Oldham becomes worst-hit area in England - as 3 places added to Covid watchlist STORM ALERT UK braced for four days of thunderstorms with lightning & floods across country GREECE IS THE WORD Brit holidaymakers gamble on Greece in last-ditch bid for summer holiday Exam regulator Ofqual has said that schools or colleges will send a centre assessment grade for the student in each of their subjects to the board. Teachers will then have to order each student from best to worst for their subjects, plus take mock exams, tests, coursework and homework into consideration. England's regulator Ofqual said the idea was to ensure confidence in the results, to give them the same value as grades from any other year. Normally students sit exams and results are given based upon these results and their submitted coursework.

Students across the UK have experienced a final year of their school education unlike any other. Pupils did not sit exams in a usual manner this year and instead were graded based upon teacher's predictions. Now hundreds of thousands of students across England, Wales and Northern Ireland will find out their highly-anticipated A-level results this week. Date when exam results come out this year - and how grades are assessed Pupils will be assessed differently this year due to the coronavirus pandemic, but what can students do if they don't agree with their given grade? A level results will soon be revealed in England, however hugging your school mates will have to wait until the one metre social distancing measures are eased At the time Prime Minister Boris Johnson said of this year's A Level students, "we will make sure their progress isn't impeded and that in time they will get the qualifications needed".

But how will A Levels be graded this year - and when will students receive their results? When is A level results day 2020? The Department for Education has confirmed that this year's A level results in England will still be published on the original date, Thursday 13 August 2020. The new system devised by the Department for Education, asks sixth form and college teachers, as well as heads of department, to award their students with a grade based on the work which had been submitted throughout the course of the student's A Levels. This process is similar to how teachers make predicted grades that students use to apply for university with.

This is in order to clarify to Ofqual the average cut off for each grade boundary and 'statistically standardise' the grade boundaries in line with the results given by teachers across the country. Additionally, data from each school's previous A Level results will be taken into consideration when confirming the accuracy of the submitted grades. If you are unhappy with your grade and you believe it does not accurately reflect your abilities or work during the course of your A Levels, you can always participate in resit exams which are to take place this month, or August 2021. This may be an attractive option to many students who want their grades to directly reflect their abilities in an exam as originally planned, before coronavirus prematurely ended the school year. - If your school/college believes the exam board has made a mistake in moderating or communicating the grades to students. It's pointing out the obvious to state that GCSE and A-level results days this summer will be unlike any others. We need to be ready to make sure results days run smoothly for students who've had the most challenging end to their time at school. If you're running results days in person, then you can allocate staff to look out for specific students. Important dates like entry deadlines for GCSE and A-level autumn exams may easily be forgotten in the haze of the day itself. Many of those disappointed students will want to know their calculated grades. Nobody wants to spend results day sending or receiving subject access requests. In cases where exam boards have moderated down your predictions, having centre-assessed grades might also help your students to get into their preferred course. Plan: How to run a socially distant results day There's likely to be a feeling of frustration and helplessness from students who didn't have a chance to take the exam and beat our predictions – and we know some of them would have done. The circumstances around these results are different from any other year, but it's still a special day. That will give us the space to spend the day celebrating and supporting students who've been through one of the hardest school years ever. A-levels 2020: When are results published, how do grades work? The ritual of picking up A-level results from school is being replaced this year with emails to students. Schools and colleges across Norfolk are preparing for an unusual set of A-level results. A-level results will be based on predicted outcomes with students unable to sit exams. Picture: Getty Images A-level results will be based on predicted outcomes with students unable to sit exams. However, the coronavirus pandemic means almost all students will be receiving their results remotely missing out on the ritual picking up that dreaded envelope at school with friends and classmates. Ofqual has said A and As-level grades will be based on teacher assessment of classroom work, mock exams and extra curricular work. Picture: Getty Images Ofqual has said A and As-level grades will be based on teacher assessment of classroom work, mock exams and extra curricular work. And having not sat exams their grades have been predicted, the fate of student's futures with university places at stake has been in the hands of teachers. However, due to coronavirus there are still many questions students and parents may have about this year's results day. The A-level results day is Thursday, August 13. Students will be receiving their results via email from about 8am. UCAS tracker system receives A-level results directly. With no exams having been sat, students have been given formal grades that fairly reflect the work they've put in, with these based on previous performance, including GCSEs and mock exams. The grades that each school and college have submitted for their students will be checked nationally to ensure they are fair and comparable to other years. Yes. The national regulator of qualifications, Ofqual, has been very clear in telling universities and colleges that this year's grades must be viewed in the same way as those from any other year. Schools and colleges can appeal to the exam board if it believes it made an error when submitting a grade or if it believes an exam board made a mistake. Pupils can ask their school or college to check whether it made an administrative error when submitting their grade - and they can ask them to submit an appeal to the exam board if it did. However students will not be able to directly appeal their calculated grades to the exam boards, but they can submit allegations about bias or discrimination. Ofqual has advised students to complain to their college or school in the first place about potential malpractice. The national regulator of qualifications, Ofqual, has been very clear in telling universities and higher education colleges that this year's grades must be viewed in the same way as those from any other year. What happens if the A-level grades are less than needed for university? As in any normal year, UCAS will be running its clearing process to help match applicants with a suitable higher education place. What if students get better than predicted grades?