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01 August 2019 17:46

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Residents and businesses were dealing with the aftermath of the flash floods in Buxton and parts of the High Peak this morning, with some evacuated from their homes. A clean-up operation is underway following last night's flash flooding - some houses were left flooded with more than a foot of water. Andrew Stewart of Stewarts Newsagents on Lightwood Road said: "We have been lucky this time. Coun Hall said: "The last time there was flooding anything like this was in 1973, when the Hogshaw to the reservoir broke its banks. READ MORE: Buxton and High Peak hit by flooding after heavy rain - pictures Coun Kemp said: "It has not been a good day for Buxton and I feel very sorry for people who have been have been hit by something like this for the second time in the past 20 years.

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"Two teams of staff are going round the affected areas with members of the housing department and benefits office to see if they can offer practical help. We will also be arranging a number of skips to be brought into the area so people can dispose of things damaged from their proerties. Coun Kemp urged motorists to drive more carefully on flooded roads. He added: "People should drive with extreme care if there is a flood on the road. 30 residential properties and two businesses in Buxton hit by flooding, Environment Agency confirms Intense heavy rain left some homes and businesses flooded on Wednesday evening and roads impassable.

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The main A6 between Buxton and Bakewell was closed after the River Wye burst its banks. Derbyshire police said its officers had dealt with numerous calls from across the area – in particular in Buxton, Whaley Bridge and New Mills – where a number of properties were flooded, with the Lightwood Road area badly affected. Flood warnings for the River Wye between Buxton and Bakewell, and the River Goyt at Whaley Bridge, have now been withdrawn, but a flood alert - meaning flooding is still possible - A police spokesperson said: "Waters are receding in areas of the High Peak hit by flooding last night; however, drivers are warned that roads may still be unpassable. A spokesperson for the Environment Agency said: "As a result of intense and very localised rainfall on Wednesday 31 July, we have had reports of a number of approximately 30 residential properties and 2 businesses flooded in Buxton from the Hogshaw Brook, a tributary of the River Wye. "River levels on the Hogshaw Brook have now fallen and the risk of further flooding in the area has reduced.

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A police spokesman said waters are receding in areas of the High Peak hit by flooding last night; however, drivers are warned that roads may still be unpassable. There are still a number of flood warnings and alerts in place for the county – particularly in the following areas: Roads and lowlying agricultural ground along the River Wye. Please avoid using low lying footpaths near rivers and streams and plan driving routes to avoid low lying roads which may be flooded. Lyme Park staff are today carrying out a massive clean up operation after the 600-year-old stately home was hit by 'devastating' flooding. Staff worked through the night to save the home's many priceless antiques and unique interiors, including the 15th Century Sarum Missal, said to be the most important book in the National Trust collection, after floodwaters swept through parts of the main house and the buildings around the Timber Yard. But the 17-acre gardens, including the reflection lake, made famous by Colin Firth's version of Pride and Prejudice, bore some of the worst of the damage, with paths, fences and planting washed away by the force of the waters. National Trust staff and conservation specialists are onsite today to assess the extent of the damage to buildings, paths and roads. Lyme's lead ranger Chris Dunkerley said they are 'unable to say' when Lyme will reopen to the public. He added: "This morning, there is widespread and extensive damage to paths and roads around Lyme, especially close to the streams and ponds that overflowed their banks. "It's devastating when we see the place we work so hard to look after impacted in this way. A massive clean-up operation is underway at Lyme today after the National Trust estate suffered serious flooding during the heavy rainfall on Wednesday. The estate was evacuated and closed to the public in the afternoon, with several visitors needing assistance from Lyme's team of rangers after becoming separated from their vehicles by the rising floodwaters. Today, Lyme remains closed to visitors, but National Trust staff and conservation specialists are onsite to assess damage to buildings, paths and roads throughout the estate, and begin the long work of cleaning up the debris and mud left by the waters that rushed through parts of the main house and the buildings around the Timber Yard. Lyme's many antiques and the beautiful mansion interiors weresaved by National Trust staff working through the evening to shore up defences, but the 17-acre gardens bore some of the worst of the damage, with paths, fences and planting washed away by the force of the waters. Lyme's Lead Ranger Chris Dunkerley said, "This morning, there is widespread and extensive damage to paths and roads around Lyme, especially close to the streams and ponds that overflowed their banks. We've taken the decision to remain closed to ensure we don't put any members of the public at risk, and so that we can start the repair work. At this point, we're unable to say when Lyme and the wider estate will reopen to the public, but we encourage members of the public to check our website before planning their visit." This isn't the first time this year that Lyme has been impacted by extreme weather. The team at Lyme work tirelessly in these situations to ensure that the impacts on the Grade II* listed estate and buildings across Lyme are managed. Chris said, "It's devastating when we see the place we work so hard to look after impacted in this way. The ongoing support of our visitors and members is even more vital at times like these, as we know recovery from the flooding will be costly to us. From buying a cup of tea to paying to visit the house and gardens, the money we receive means we can continue to care for places like Lyme."

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