loading...

10 February 2020 10:53

Birmingham City F.C. Swansea City A.F.C. Garry Monk

weather forecast

Storm Ciara: Disruption across Wales as clean-up begins

Travel disruption set to continue with more strong winds, snow and ice in the north As of 5am on Monday, UK Power Networks reported more than 18,500 properties across the east and south-east of England were still without power while Western Power Distribution said more than 2,800 homes were left in the dark. Parts of the UK were hit by blizzards and up to 20cm of snow in the wake of the storm, with travel disruption set to continue. Facebook Twitter Pinterest A Faversham to Victoria train that was stopped by a fallen tree on Sunday as Storm Ciara hit the UK. Some areas had a month and a half's rainfall in 24 hours as gusts of more than 90mph swept across the country on Sunday with 178 flood warnings in place. Flights, ferries and trains were cancelled or delayed, while drivers faced treacherous conditions with flood water, fallen trees and other debris closing roads.

uk weather

A Met Office amber weather warning for wind, which had been in place across most of England, elapsed at 9pm on Sunday as Storm Ciara moved away to the north-east of Scotland. A yellow warning for wind remained in force for the whole UK until midnight, with strong winds, heavy showers, snow and ice expected on Monday. Facebook Twitter Pinterest A car submerged as flood water covers roads in Mytholmroyd, northern England, on Sunday. A yellow warning for heavy snow and strong winds is in place for Northern Ireland and most of Scotland and a yellow warning of snow and ice was in force for north-west England throughout Monday and Tuesday. Facebook Twitter Pinterest A house cut off by flood water in the Scottish Border town of Peebles Photograph: David Cheskin/Getty Images Train passengers were being advised to check with operators before travelling as there were likely to be cancellations to early trains as Network Rail engineers worked through the night to assess the damage.

uk storm

Motorists were also warned to take care with continued disruption to the road network and tricky driving conditions likely to continue into rush-hour. Airports around the country on Sunday night told travellers to check their flight with their airline due to the continuing bad weather conditions. More than 200 flood warnings were issued across England on Sunday, with the town of Appleby-in-Westmorland, in Cumbria, severely hit. Facebook Twitter Pinterest Flood water rushes down a street past houses in Mytholmroyd, northern England, on Sunday. Roads remain closed and train services cancelled as the clean-up gets under way following Storm Ciara.

uk power networks

Winds hit 93mph (150k/ph) on the Llŷn Peninsula in Gwynedd on Sunday, with the rail network effectively shut all day across Wales. More than a dozen flood warnings remain in force on Monday - including on the River Elwy in Denbighshire. Western Power Distribution said it had thousands of homes hit by power cuts across south Wales on Sunday - but supplies were restored to all but two properties by Monday morning. SP Energy Networks said at the height of the storm, 20,000 homes across north Wales were affected, and on Monday its engineers were still working to restore electricity to about 1,900 properties. Many roads remain closed across Wales following the storm.

The main A470 trunk road in north Wales is shut in and around Llanrwst, in the Conwy Valley, after sustaining widespread flooding on Sunday. Image caption The Conwy Valley town of Llanrwst felt the full force of Storm Ciara A number of schools in north Wales will be closed on Monday after being damaged in the storm. Snow and ice set to hit UK after chaos caused by Storm Ciara More than 20,000 homes are without power and parts of the UK could see blizzards and up to 20cm of snow after the weekend chaos of Storm Ciara. Sunday brought flooding, evacuations and travel disruption as winds reached 97mph and some areas saw a month and a half's rainfall in just 24 hours. Rail users are being advised to check with operators before travelling, with several warning of delays and cancellations due to flooding and as Network Rail engineers work to clear the tracks and repair damaged power lines. Motorists have also been warned of difficult conditions on the roads in the aftermath of Storm Ciara due to fallen trees, downed power cables, flooding and also with snow and ice forecast. Sky News weather presenter Isobel Lang said: "Storm Ciara has now cleared but has left unsettled weather with further strong winds and heavy showers, and these will turn increasingly wintry over the next 24 to 48 hours. Sunday saw more than 200 flood warnings issued across England, with the town of Appleby-in-Westmorland, in Cumbria, severely hit. He said: "Some significant river flooding is possible across parts of the north of England today due to heavy, persistent rain and severe gale force winds associated with Storm Ciara. Power was cut to 539,000 properties on Sunday and there were delays and cancellations on flights, ferries and trains as drivers contended with flooding and fallen trees. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Storm Ciara has brought severe gales and flooding in its wake Disruption is continuing as the after-effects of Storm Ciara are felt across the UK, following widespread flooding and severe gales. More than 20,000 homes spent the night without power, while flood warnings remain in place across the country. Heavy rain and gusts up to 97mph caused widespread flooding and travel disruption on Sunday. Traffic Scotland said snow and wind were causing difficult driving conditions on the road network. A warning for wind and snow is in place for the entire day throughout Northern Ireland and most of Scotland. Image copyright Network Rail Image caption Trees continue to cause problems for the trains - this blocked the line between Dorking and Horsham on Monday morning Image copyright Amanda Webster Image caption A sinkhole opened up in Belfield, Greater Manchester, following the storm Almost 200 flood warnings remain in place around the UK - meaning that flooding is expected - with more than 120 in England, around 50 in Scotland, and 13 in Wales. UK Power Networks reported more than 18,500 properties across east and south-east England were still without power on Monday morning, while Western Power Distribution said more than 2,800 homes were in the dark. Flights have also been affected by the storm, with hundreds cancelled on Sunday, and dozens more expected on Monday. Airports have told travellers to check their flight with their airline, with British Airways warning passengers that there might be a "minor knock-on effect" to Monday's schedule. Gatwick Airport said it expected some delays and cancellations as it "recovers from the impact of Storm Ciara".