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17 October 2019 17:57

Boxing Charles Conwell Oleksandr Usyk

charles conwell

Patrick Day never wanted to die in the ring but he did want to be a professional boxer and he knew every risk he took each time he stripped to fight, each time he walked to the ring and tried to knock out the man in the opposite corner. Last Saturday, in an undercard fight in Chicago, Day was dropped three times and stopped in round ten by a promising young, unbeaten fighter called Charles Conwell; Conwell is not known as a ruthless puncher and the sad history of boxing deaths is full of nice guys like Conwell killing innocent men like Day. It is part of our bloody and, at times, indefensible business. Day was rushed to hospital after the fight, rushed through observation, x-rays and prepared for theatre. That's the grim nuts and bolts version of the desperate fight to save a boxer once he leaves the care of his trainer and family and ends up in the rubber-gloved hands of a neurosurgeon. Boxing, for the fourth time in four months, mourned for a dead fighter.

charles conwell

Day was 27, the loss was his fourth in 22 fights. It needs to be pointed out that there was nothing that could have improved Day's chance of living once he signed for the fight, arrived at the venue and entered the ring. Day was, according to all those who knew him, a nice guy, a contender in his own right and not a boxer on a dreadful losing streak. Day was looked after by good people, had cleared all pre-fight medicals, he was guided by experienced men in his career and he was not a kid with problems away from the ring – the kind of problems that can help shorten the life expectancy of a boxer. Sporting deaths in 2019 Show all 23 left Created with Sketch.

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Sporting deaths in 2019 1/23 Emiliano Sala, 28 Emiliano Sala, the former Nantes footballer who joined Cardiff City, died in plane crash in the English Channel (31 October 1990 - 21 January 2019) Getty 2/23 Gene Okerlund, 76 Gene Okerlund, WWE announcer (19 December 1942 - 2 January 2019) Getty 3/23 Frank Robinson, 83 Frank Robsinon, Hall of Fame baseball player and manager (31 August 1935 - 7 February 2019) Getty 4/23 Gordan Banks, 81 Gordon Banks, the 1966 World Cup-winning England goalkeeper, passed away peacefully (30 December 1937 - 11 February 2019) Getty 5/23 Eric Harrison, 81 Eric Harrison, the former Manchester United youth coach who discovered the Class of 92 side, died aged 81 (5 February 1938 - 13 February 2019) @ManUtd / Twitter 6/23 Kelly Catlin, 23 A world champion cyclist, Catlin also won silver at the Rio Olympics (3 November 1995 - 10 March 2019) AFP/Getty 7/23 Charlie Whiting, 66 F1 race director Charlie Whiting died after suffering a pulmonary embolism in Melbourne ahead of the Australian Grand Prix (12 August 1952 - 14 March 2019) PA 8/23 Tommy Smith, 74 Former Liverpool and England footballer Tommy Smith died after being diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in 2014 (5 April 1945 - 12 April 2019) Getty 9/23 Billy McNeill, 79 Former Celtic captain and Scotland defender Billy McNeill died after being diagnosed with dementia (2 March 1940 - 22 April 2019) Getty Images 10/23 Horacio Sala, 58 Horacio Sala, father of the late Cardiff City striker Emiliano, died following a heart attack. Racing Photos via Getty 22/23 Antoine Hubert, 22 Anthoine Hubert died during the F2 Belgian Grand Prix feature race (22 September 1996 - 31 august 2019) Getty 23/23 Melanie Tyndall, 32 Melanie Tyndall died after falling off a horse during a race in Darwin (1 September 2019) Darwin Turf Club 1/23 Emiliano Sala, 28 Emiliano Sala, the former Nantes footballer who joined Cardiff City, died in plane crash in the English Channel (31 October 1990 - 21 January 2019) Getty 2/23 Gene Okerlund, 76 Gene Okerlund, WWE announcer (19 December 1942 - 2 January 2019) Getty 3/23 Frank Robinson, 83 Frank Robsinon, Hall of Fame baseball player and manager (31 August 1935 - 7 February 2019) Getty 4/23 Gordan Banks, 81 Gordon Banks, the 1966 World Cup-winning England goalkeeper, passed away peacefully (30 December 1937 - 11 February 2019) Getty 5/23 Eric Harrison, 81 Eric Harrison, the former Manchester United youth coach who discovered the Class of 92 side, died aged 81 (5 February 1938 - 13 February 2019) @ManUtd / Twitter 6/23 Kelly Catlin, 23 A world champion cyclist, Catlin also won silver at the Rio Olympics (3 November 1995 - 10 March 2019) AFP/Getty 7/23 Charlie Whiting, 66 F1 race director Charlie Whiting died after suffering a pulmonary embolism in Melbourne ahead of the Australian Grand Prix (12 August 1952 - 14 March 2019) PA 8/23 Tommy Smith, 74 Former Liverpool and England footballer Tommy Smith died after being diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in 2014 (5 April 1945 - 12 April 2019) Getty 9/23 Billy McNeill, 79 Former Celtic captain and Scotland defender Billy McNeill died after being diagnosed with dementia (2 March 1940 - 22 April 2019) Getty Images 10/23 Horacio Sala, 58 Horacio Sala, father of the late Cardiff City striker Emiliano, died following a heart attack. (13 June 1991 - 1 July 2019) Getty 18/23 Pernell Whitaker, 55 Former four-weight world champion and Hall of Fame boxer (2 January 1964 - 15 July 2019) AFP/Getty Images 19/23 Steve Booth, 42 Former Leicester Tigers and Bath rugby player (18 September 1976 - 14 August 2019) Getty 20/23 Archie Bruce, 20 Batley Bulldogs rugby league player found dead in his hotel room in Toulouse a day after making his club debut (Died 18 August 2019) Twitter/@BatleyRLFC 21/23 Mikaela Claridge, 22 Australian jockey died after falling from a horse during trackword at Cranbourne Racecourse. Day was - like most of the dead men I have covered, met, befriended, cried over, interviewed, written about, spoken about - just an ordinary man trying to get a living in the world's most frustrating of legal sports. The business of boxing has exemplary safety measures – the British Boxing Board of Control has the finest system in the world – and procedures, but men and women will die and there is absolutely nothing that can be done to prevent death. During the last week I have been ringside to watch 11-year-old boys box on their club show in the Midlands, ringside for the boxing fairy tale that is Josh Warrington in Leeds, on Sunday morning I took testimony from men and women spared prison by their devotion to boxing and on Wednesday night, as the machines in Day's fragile life went blank, I interviewed Sam Eggington, the former British welterweight champion. He has the same dreams as Day and he told me a life-affirming tale or two. He had to pay his corner and he had to repay a debt for his MRI brain scan, a strict requirement for all British boxers before they can fight. His life, in his eyes, was transformed that night, changed by what he had achieved in a boxing ring. A few years later Egginton was British and European champion, now he has his eyes set on a world title at some point. Day was gazing in the same direction, both normal, decent men chasing one of the most dangerous dreams on the planet. Patrick Day's death follows a pattern - boxing must do more to protect its fighters The fatal blow against the undefeated Charles Conwell came at the end of a hard, exhausting contest - when fighters are most vulnerable Patrick Day (left) and Charles Conwell exchange punches in the seventh round of their super-welterweight in Chicago (Getty Images) A second boxer in three weeks, a fourth this year, has died from injuries sustained in the ring. He was an elite fighter, a tad shy of world class as an amateur and a pro, but hugely respected and universally liked. He boxed for love, a passion that ultimately cost him his life in Chicago on Saturday night. Few had paid to see Day take on a prospect in his 22nd pro fight. Day was down three times. Day was attended rapidly by ringside medical staff before being rushed to hospital, where he suffered seizures before falling into a coma. Day leaves the ring on a stretcher after sustaining a fatal brain injury (Getty Images) Day loved boxing. The fatal blow came at the end of a hard, exhausting contest when fighters are at their most vulnerable. In the space of six days in July Russian Maxim Dadashev, 28, and Hugo Santillan of Argentina, 23, died of brain injuries. Maxim Dadashev (left) died from brain injuries in July (Getty Images) The theory is fighters who might naturally be middleweights [160] makes themselves welters [147] on the basis that they will carry the power advantage of a bigger man into the ring a day later. It then becomes a battle of extremes, who can shed the most weight effectively to carry the greater power advantage into the fight. In the early days of the sport weight divisions were introduced to match fighters of similar builds, classically welter, middle and heavyweight. Essentially the categories are abused by a sport that encourages fighters to hit artificially low weights in order to seek an advantage.

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