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10 February 2020 23:57

Chelsea F.C. N'Golo Kanté Maurizio Sarri

agatha christie

Agatha Christie's "The Pale Horse" Anticipated a Real Murder

The Pale Horse aired on BBC One over the weekend with its first of two hour-long episodes. The murder mystery is based on Agatha Christie's novel of the same name. One of the locations featured is a village called Much Deeping - but does it actually exist? Is Much Deeping a real place in The Pale Horse? As lovely as Much Deeping looks in the series it is in fact a fictional place.

agatha christie

In the series the sign for Much Deeping says the village is in Surrey. However, no such place actually exists in real life, unfortunately. READ MORE: The Pale Horse BBC location: Where is The Pale Horse filmed? The Witches live at The Pale Horse READ MORE The Pale Horse: Fans spot inaccuracy in Agatha Christie drama In the series Much Deeping is the village which is home to the three witches. The Pale Horse is the name of a pub in the village, and is where the witches reside.

agatha christie

Mark Easterbrook (played by Rufus Sewell) first visits Much Deeping when he realises his late wife Delphine (Georgina Campbell) went there before she died in mysterious circumstances. Much Deeping is an eerie village in The Pale Horse The eerie village fete in Much Deeping Mark makes a quick exit from the mysterious village after speaking to the witches following the fete. "The plot unfolds at a steady, confident pace, with the director as surefooted as her writer, parcelling out twists and treats and fine performances as it goes" The Pale Horse, BBC1 "No one could accuse Sarah Phelps of sluggish storytelling. Within the first ten minutes of The Pale Horse we had not one, not two, but three dead women. Phelps excels at displaying the cankered truth beneath privileged, polite society.

agatha christie

The plot unfolds at a steady, confident pace, with the director, Leonora Lonsdale, as surefooted as her writer, parcelling out twists and treats and fine performances as it goes." "The Pale Horse is her fifth Christie adaptation for the BBC and most of it had only a passing acquaintance with the source material. "If you're suffering withdrawal symptoms after the impressive finale to The Trial of Christine Keeler, BBC1 has dished up another helping of posh philanderers, doomed showgirls and Swinging Sixties period detail – with an added pinch of the sinister and possibly supernatural." Fred Thursday was jaded, slapdash and didn't know how many more murders he had left in him, so he bought a pair of budgies to cheer himself up. "The testy detective returned for a new series of Endeavour, easily the best period crime drama on telly and at its confident peak here." Christopher Stevens, Daily Mail There was plenty of time left for a bit of gently taking the mickey out of the cliches of the format. Mark has to think fast or he'll end up in trouble (Picture: BBC) Agatha Christie's The Pale Horse got off to a chilling start on the BBC with sudden deaths taking over Mark Easterbrook's (Rufus Sewell) life. Starting with his wife Delphine, before his mistress Tomasina, it seems whatever took them is now taking him.

But obviously, as this is a mystery film, there's a lot more going on than even we know about. Hermia (Kaya Scodelario) had been after Mark for a while and was even present in their home when Delphine was electrocuted in the bath. Delphine's death also appeared different from the others, who seemed to die of natural causes, whereas hers was an accident. But she also appears to have a massively nasty angry streak, and doesn't trust Mark at all. Or does she know something about Mark that we don't yet. Tomasina's stepmum didn't exactly look heartbroken on the discovery of her dead stepdaughter's body, and the only assumption from that is because she is probably now about to get a lot of money. Why did David need the money? We're going to be frank – Much Deeping is giving us some serious Wicker Man vibes, and in that movie someone ended up burned to death. The perma-beige town has some of its own unique traditions, and there's nothing wrong with a bit of paganism, but everyone encountered in the town looked like they had a secret. So would Mark and Hermia's sudden appearance at their village fair have been entirely welcome? Why did David Ardingley need the money? David Ardingley seems like a bit of a slimeball, if we're honest here. Seeing as Tomasina's stepmother also went on holiday, could they somehow know each other? Is Oscar hiding more than he lets on? Top of the list of 'residents who appear to be hiding secrets' is Oscar, who, quite rightly, got freaked out when a businessman started following him around his village like a shadow. Turns out he met Delphine the night of her death, and helped her to the train station after she was told the news her husband would be 'married to someone else by Autumn. Is David's wife Hermia hiding something? All of these seemingly unconnected deaths appear to be connected in one major way – before their deaths, they all began to lose their hair. It's something that, in a massive red flag, Mark has started suffering too. But what is it that is causing these seemingly healthy people to drop dead at a moment's notice, after beginning to shed their hair for next to no reason? More: BBC Kate Ferdinand 'couldn't live up to' the memory of Rio's late wife Rio Ferdinand's son worried for dad after he turned to booze after mum Rebecca's death Greta Thunberg to star in new documentary series for BBC The psychics are pretty creepy by anyone's standards, but they certainly seem to know their stuff. But we also know all the victims have crossed their paths, which makes us think there's more to them than meets the eye. Are they truly mystic, or are they playing along with the charade to hide something more sinister? The Pale Horse concludes next Sunday at 9pm on BBC One. If you've got a celebrity story, video or pictures get in touch with the Metro.co.uk entertainment team by emailing us [email protected], calling 020 3615 2145 or by visiting our Submit Stuff page - we'd love to hear from you. MORE: David Suchet wants to star in an Agatha Christie's Poirot movie High-profile television adaptation aside, The Pale Horse might not be one of Agatha Christie's best-known novels. But there's another reason that this novel has drawn attention over the years. While it may not be quite as mysterious as Christie's own brief disappearance, the novel does have a connection to a harrowing event that took place in the world outside its pages. At The Guardian, Kathyn Harkup explores the novel's history — and its connection to a real-life murder case. The plot of The Pale Horse involves poisoning; Harkup notes that Christie's details of the symptoms turned out to have practical application to her readers. "It is sufficiently detailed that on two occasions readers recognised symptoms in people who were being poisoned and were able to intervene," Harkup writes. But there's also some controversy that surrounds the novel for the opposite reason: in other words, that it might have helped inspire a killer. There are certainly some uncomfortable parallels between The Pale Horse and the crimes committed by Graham Young. The novel was published in 1961, the year before Young began his poisoning activities, but at his trial in 1971 he denied having read it Young, also known as "The Bovingdon Poisoner," had a long history of poisoning family members and co-workers, leading to several of their deaths. If Young was indeed emulating Christie's plot, there's an even more sinister wrinkle to be found here: Young himself was the cited inspiration for another poisoner many years later. But if it did turn out to be a case of life imitating life imitating art, it's a particularly unnerving example of it — the kind of thing that, if you read it in a novel, you might find too unbelievable. Subscribe here for our free daily newsletter. Read the full story at The Guardian