loading...

19 March 2020 18:44

Chloroquine phosphate, an old-fashioned anti-malarial drug, has shown strong results against COVID-19 infections in South Korea and China.

antimalarial medication

Chloroquine phosphate, an old-fashioned anti-malarial drug, has shown strong results against COVID-19 infections in South Korea and China. Recent guidelines from South Korea and China report that chloroquine is an effective antiviral therapeutic treatment against Coronavirus Disease 2019. Use of chloroquine (tablets) is showing favorable outcomes in humans infected with Coronavirus including faster time to recovery and shorter hospital stay. US CDC research shows that chloroquine also has strong potential as a prophylactic (preventative) measure against coronavirus in the lab, while we wait for a vaccine to be developed. According to South Korean and China human treatment guidelines, chloroquine is effective in treating COVID-19.

antimalarial medication

We must explore whether chloroquine can safely serve as a preventative measure prior to infection of COVID-19 to stop further spread of this highly contagious virus. A coronavirus is a type of virus which can cause illness in animals and people. Experts say the bug, which has killed around one in 50 patients since the outbreak began in December, is a 'sister' of the SARS illness which hit China in 2002, so has been named after it. The disease that the virus causes has been named COVID-19, which stands for coronavirus disease 2019. Dr Helena Maier, from the Pirbright Institute, said: 'Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that infect a wide range of different species including humans, cattle, pigs, chickens, dogs, cats and wild animals.

antimalarial medication

'Until this new coronavirus was identified, there were only six different coronaviruses known to infect humans. Four of these cause a mild common cold-type illness, but since 2002 there has been the emergence of two new coronaviruses that can infect humans and result in more severe disease (Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses). 'Coronaviruses are known to be able to occasionally jump from one species to another and that is what happened in the case of SARS, MERS and the new coronavirus. The first human cases were publicly reported from the Chinese city of Wuhan, where approximately 11million people live, after medics first started publicly reporting infections on December 31. Tests were developed for the new virus and recorded cases started to surge.

antimalarial medication

The first cases of COVID-19 came from people visiting or working in a live animal market in Wuhan, which has since been closed down for investigation. A study by the Wuhan Institute of Virology, published in February 2020 in the scientific journal Nature, found that the genetic make-up virus samples found in patients in China is 96 per cent identical to a coronavirus they found in bats. It is similar to SARS, which infected 8,000 people and killed nearly 800 in an outbreak in Asia in 2003, in that it is a type of coronavirus which infects humans' lungs. This allows others to study them, develop tests and potentially look into treating the illness they cause. However, the director-general of China's Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Gao Fu, said the virus was mutating and adapting as it spread through people.

antimalarial medication

More study may be able to reveal whether the virus first infected a small number of people then change and spread from them, or whether there were various versions of the virus coming from animals which have developed separately. Experts have been conflicted since the beginning of the outbreak about whether the true number of people who are infected is significantly higher than the official numbers of recorded cases. No vaccine exists for the coronavirus yet and it's not likely one will be developed in time to be of any use in this outbreak, for similar reasons to the above. Currently, governments and health authorities are working to contain the virus and to care for patients who are sick and stop them infecting other people. Pharma company Bayer will soon make a large donation to the U.S. government of a drug that has shown some promise in helping patients suffering from the novel coronavirus, according to a senior Health and Human Services official and another source with direct knowledge.

The big picture: Early evidence suggests that chloroquine — an inexpensive anti-malarial drug — may work just as well, if not even better, than remdesivir, a drug owned by Gilead, which is undergoing clinical trials for treatment of the coronavirus. A study published in Nature found that "remdesivir and chloroquine are highly effective in the control of 2019-nCoV infection in vitro." Chloroquine, a cheap drug used in Africa for decades to cure malaria may be able treat COVID-19, a study published in Nature has found. "Early evidence suggests that chloroquine — an inexpensive anti-malarial drug — may work just as well, if not even better, than remdesivir, a drug owned by Gilead, which is undergoing clinical trials for treatment of the coronavirus," Axios said. In a scoop on Wednesday, Axios quoted a senior Health and Human Services official and another source as confirming that Pharma company Bayer will soon make a large donation to the U.S. government of a drug that has shown some promise in helping patients suffering from the novel coronavirus. As death toll from coronavirus tops 8,000, scientists and researchers are working around the clock to develop vaccine for the deadly virus. In their fight against the deadly coronavirus, hospitals are experimenting existing antiviral medications to treat patients with the disease. For example, NHS hospitals in the United Kingdom are trying medicines already in use for conditions ranging from HIV to rheumatoid arthritis, malaria, the flu and even Ebola are serious contenders and are being tested to see how they could help patients infected with COVID-19. One of the drugs being used by NHS Hospitals doctors in fighting the coronavirus outbreak is Chloroquine phosphate. However, tests of the drug, which has been used since World War, on COVID-19 patients in China show it has potential in fighting the life-threatening virus. We wrote about this yesterday after a new academic study showed that over-the-counter anti-malaria med Chloroquine may be highly effective at treating coronavirus. Rigano, Esq., in consultation with Stanford University School of Medicine, UAB School of Medicine, and National Academy of Sciences researchers, shows that over the counter anti-malaria pills Chloroquine may be highly effective at treating coronavirus COVID-19. A team of experts said that,"It is easy to conjure up the idea that hydroxychloroquine may be a potent candidate to treat infection by SARS-CoV-2." The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) study also shows that the hydroxychloroquine is more potent in killing the virus off in vitro (in the test tube to not in the body). Results showed three quarters of patients treated with the drug were cleared of the virus within six days. Lopinavir/ritonavir, marketed as Kaletra and Aluvia, is an anti-HIV medicine given to people living with the virus to prevent it developing into AIDS.