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16 August 2020 08:39

Clemency Burton-Hill Saint Anne's on the Sea Borough of Fylde

BBC presenter Clemency Burton-Hill has revealed she suffered a serious brain haemorrhage after collapsing at work. The presenter of Radio 3's Classical Fix had emergency brain surgery earlier this year after she passed out during a meeting in New York, where she is creative director of classical station WQXR. She suffered a haemorrhage caused by a previously undiagnosed arteriovenous malformation (AVM), an uncommon and abnormal cluster of blood vessels in her brain. The 39-year-old, who was unconscious for 17 days, told how music was played to her 24 hours a day through a small speaker next to her bed and said that, just before she regained consciousness, she seemed to make a choice of whether to give up or live. Ms Burton-Hill, who writes movingly about her terrifying brush with death in today's You magazine, told BBC Arts Online: 'It was literally: "I can do this, I'm going to get through this." Music is the opposite of despair.' BBC presenter Clemency Burton-Hill, pictured, has opened up about her experience of suffering a brain hemmorage and spending 17 days unconscious.

She also revealed how she has begun to relearn how to speak and walk, and is undergoing physical therapy to strengthen the right side of her body, which was affected by the bleed. As part of her recovery, she has even managed to play the violin with the help of her friend, the violinist Nicola Benedetti, using her left hand on the instrument's strings while Ms Benedetti bows. She said: 'It's a cliched idea that music is beyond language, but from what I've experienced in my own brain, I truly know that now. Clemency Burton-Hill revealed how she has begun to relearn how to speak and walk, and is undergoing physical therapy to strengthen the right side of her body 'I really believe music is a part of my recovery because it uses both sides of the brain. And sometimes it's the thing that helps me to get up and fight.' As well as her programme on Radio 3, Ms Burton-Hill, who attended Cambridge University and the Royal College of Music, is also a presenter of The Culture Show, BBC Young Musician, The Review Show and the BBC Proms.

She has two sons with her diplomat husband, James Roscoe. I tried to speak, then the world went dark – in You magazine 'I tried to speak, then the world went dark' Only six months ago, a terrifying bleed on the brain left Clemency Burton-Hill unable to see, talk or walk – yet she has defied medical expectation to relearn all three. In the US, where I live, it was a public holiday: Martin Luther King Day. I didn't go to my office at New York Public Radio, where I am creative director at classical music station WQXR, but instead I headed to a work meeting in Brooklyn. My husband James took our two sons, aged five and one, to the Liberty science museum. I tried to speak again – the words were clear in my brain but came out as gobbledygook.

I came round in a hospital bed 17 days later, half of my skull missing, and I had no idea where I was or what had happened. At first I thought I was dreaming but, when I tried to speak, I still couldn't produce the words. I was having a massive brain haemorrhage caused by an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) – a tangle of abnormal blood vessels connecting arteries and veins. At Mount Sinai West the swift action of a heroic medical team, led by expert neurosurgeon Dr Christopher Kellner, saved my life. But my family and friends were told to prepare for the possibility that I would be unable to understand, speak, see and walk again. With husband James Roscoe in their local park in June The hospital went into lockdown on 18 March, the day after my 39th birthday. Meanwhile, my friend Nicky is helping me play by bowing for me while I do the left hand: the first time we tried, I wept like a baby. (I have always believed in the life-altering power of music; now I know.) I am as curious and thirsty for knowledge as ever. Being unable to speak felt like a kind of solitary confinement. I choose life in all its complexity; aware of its beauty, its pain, its hope, its fragility, its love. BBC Radio 3 Classical Fix presenter Clemency Burton-Hill has revealed she suffered a serious brain haemorrhage earlier this year after collapsing during a meeting in New York. As well as presenting for the BBC, she is the creative director of US classical music station WQXR. After being unconscious for 17 days she is now making a good recovery. The haemorrhage in January was caused by a previously undiagnosed condition – an arteriovenous malformation. Clemency has told BBC Arts Online that music was played to her all day and all night while she was unconscious and that it provided her with hope. "It was literally: I can do this, I'm going to get through this," she said. She has begun the process of re-learning to speak and walk, and is undergoing physical therapy to strengthen the right side of her body which was affected by the bleed. And sometimes it's the thing that helps me to get up, and fight, and to live." BBC presenter Clemency Burton-Hill has revealed she suffered a serious brain haemorrhage earlier this year. The presenter of Radio 3's Classical Fix, 39, had emergency brain surgery after she collapsed during a meeting in New York, where she is creative director of classical station WQXR. She had suffered a massive haemorrhage caused by a previously undiagnosed condition: an arteriovenous malformation (AVM), an uncommon and abnormal cluster of blood vessels meshing the arteries and veins in her brain. We wanted to share with you an article about our friend & presenter Clemency Burton Hill, who opens up for the first time about a serious brain haemorrhage she suffered in January & music's role in her recovery @BBCRadio3 @bbcarts @BBCSounds @bbcpress — BBC Arts Publicity Team (@BBCArtsPR) August 15, 2020 Burton-Hill was unconscious for the following 17 days but music was played to her all day and all night through a small speaker by her bed and now remembers that music provided her with hope, saying that just before she regained consciousness, she seemed to make a choice of whether to give up or to live. She told BBC Arts Online: "It was literally: I can do this, I'm going to get through this. She has begun the process of re-learning to speak and walk, and is undergoing physical therapy to strengthen the right side of her body which was affected by the bleed and says music has kept her going, describing it as "the ultimate motivation". Burton-Hill has also managed to play music with her friend, the violinist Nicola Benedetti, as she plays the left hand on the violin and Benedetti bows and said: "It's a cliched idea that music is beyond language, but from what I've experienced in my own brain, I truly know that now." She added: "I really believe music is a part of my recovery because it uses both sides of the brain. "And sometimes it's the thing that helps me to get up, and fight, and to live."