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16 May 2020 00:35

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Louisville Seeks Federal Review of Police Killing of Breonna Taylor

The shooting death of Breonna Taylor, 26, by police during a raid at her home in Louisville, Kentucky, has sparked outrage around the country and a demand for answers. Breonna Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were asleep in their apartment when just before 1 a.m. on March 13 three plainclothes officers with the Louisville Metro Police Department arrived to execute a search warrant in a drug case. According to The Courier-Journal in Louisville, a judge had approved a "no-knock" search warrant, meaning police could enter the home without identifying themselves. At a March 13 news conference, police Lt. Ted Eidem said officers had knocked on the door several times and "announced their presence as police who were there with a search warrant." After forcing their way in, they "were immediately met by gunfire," Eidem said. But the lawsuit by Taylor's family says that police did not knock or identify themselves before they busted into the apartment.

Her family said officers were looking for a man named Jamarcus Glover, who lived in a different part of the city and was already in police custody when Taylor's home was raided. Civil rights attorney Ben Crump was hired by Taylor's family this week and called out the police department for not providing "any answers regarding the facts and circumstances of how this tragedy occurred." "We stand with the family of this young woman in demanding answers from the Louisville Police Department," the attorney said in a statement Monday on Twitter, calling Taylor's death a "senseless killing." Crump, who is also representing the family of Ahmaud Arbery, said at a news conference on Wednesday that the police cannot continue to "kill our black women and escape any accountability." "The warrant in and of itself looks like another wild goose chase to try and get drug dealers and other folks in Louisville, and Breonna Taylor got lumped right into the middle of it," Aguiar said. Louisville officials have now asked the U.S. Justice Department and the FBI to review the police department's internal investigation of the killing of a black woman by officers raiding her home two months ago. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear has called for an outside review into the killing of Breonna Taylor, who was shot eight times on March 13 by police The police review is going to the state's attorney general since the county's prosecutor, Thomas Wine, recused himself from the case, a statement by the mayor's office said. Wine also asked state officials to appoint a special prosecutor for the case on Wednesday to avoid a conflict of interest since he is prosecuting Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, for the shooting of the officer.

Taylor was gunned down by police who broke through her apartment door while serving a no-knock search warrant for a suspect in a drug investigation. Cops busted into Taylor's home even though the actual drug suspect listen in the search warrant was Jamarcus Glover who was arrested earlier that same day 'More than 25 bullets hit objects in the home's living room, dining room, kitchen, bathroom, hallway, both bedrooms in Taylor and Walker's apartment and into the adjacent home, where a five-year-old child and pregnant mother lived,' the lawsuit states. The case emerged in the national spotlight when Taylor's family hired prominent civil rights lawyer Benjamin Crump, who also represents the family of Ahmaud Arbery, the black jogger who was shot dead in Georgia in February. But Breonna Taylor was sleeping while black in the sanctity of her own home,' Crump said during a news conference. On March 13, Breonna Taylor was shot to death in her own home by Louisville, Ky., police officers.

Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, says he believed they were being robbed and fired a gun at police, striking one officer in the leg. I believe Breonna Taylor's story happens all the time, and people don't know that because the news usually reports Taylor's story this way: "A police officer was shot at while attempting to arrest a suspected drug dealer. It was published March 13, before national civil rights advocates brought attention to the case, and it was headlined: "LMPD officer shot, woman killed during drug investigation off St. Andrews Church Road." Officers were at an apartment on Springfield Drive about 1 a.m. Friday serving a search warrant as part of the narcotics investigation, according to Assistant Police Chief Josh Judah. A female was shot and killed during the encounter after three LMPD officers returned fire, and a suspect was arrested at the scene, Chief Steve Conrad said. Notice the report says "suspects" were shot, implying that Taylor was not only armed but fired at police officers.

The family of a decorated Louisville EMT who was fatally shot by police has hired a prominent civil rights attorney with the Black Lives Matter movement in their lawsuit against three officers. Breonna Taylor, 26, was shot eight times by Louisville Metro Police officers who entered her apartment around 1 a.m. March 13. Police have said the officers were serving a search warrant as part of a narcotics investigation, but no drugs were found at the home. In fact, the reason the Taylor family's civil lawsuit against these police officers is unlikely to succeed is that recent Supreme Court precedent makes it clear that you cannot sue the cops when they break into your house and shoot you. Minutes later, Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, lay dead on her hallway floor, shot at least eight times by plainclothes officers who had burst in to execute a "no-knock" search warrant at her home.

What happened that night at Taylor's Springfield Drive apartment in southwest Jefferson County has sparked a national debate on the use of force and the shootings of unarmed black Americans by police. Attorneys for Taylor's family say that around the time police entered the home, Walker called 911, believing "that their house was being invaded." It's not clear if the call came before or after shots were fired. She wasn't there on March 13, but attorneys for both Taylor and Walker said Palmer could have been killed if she had been home. The shots were fired inside Taylor's apartment, as well as from at least one officer who was outside and firing blind into the home, according to the family's lawsuit. She died at 12:48 a.m., five minutes after police entered and Walker fired his gun, according to the Jefferson County Coroner's Office. At the same time police entered Taylor's apartment, police officers across town were executing a separate search warrant at the "trap house" in the Russell neighborhood. At 12:40 a.m. March 13, officers arrived at 2424 Elliott Ave., referenced extensively in the search warrant police obtained for Taylor's apartment. In a press conference on the police shooting hours later that same day, Lt. Ted Eidem with LMPD's Public Integrity Unit said officers were "immediately met by gunfire" when they entered Taylor's apartment. In a subsequent search warrant for Taylor's home obtained less than three hours after the shooting, LMPD officers told a judge that narcotics detectives who entered the apartment that night returned gunfire "in the course of protecting themselves and other civilians." The statement in the search warrant also incorrectly names Taylor as the "subject" armed with a gun who fired a shot that hit a detective. But by the time Eidem spoke at the news conference, roughly 15 hours after the shooting, he identified Walker as the individual charged with attempted murder of a police officer. See also:Kentucky governor says state attorney general, feds should review Breonna Taylor case (AP) — Louisville officials have now asked the U.S. Justice Department and the FBI to review the police department's internal investigation of the killing of a black woman by officers raiding her home two months ago. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear also called for an outside review into the killing of Breonna Taylor, who was shot eight times on March 13 by police who broke through her apartment door while serving a no-knock search warrant for a suspect in a drug investigation. Wine also asked state officials to appoint a special prosecutor for the case on Wednesday to avoid a conflict of interest since he is prosecuting Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, for the shooting of the officer. A lawyer for Walker said he fired in self-defense because the officers did not announce themselves, a point disputed by Louisville police.