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19 November 2020 16:37

Coma United Arab Emirates Boxing

Coronavirus miracle as Birmingham hospital consultant gives birth to twins while in coma

A pregnant mother suffering from Covid-19 woke up from her month-long coma to discover she had given birth to twins. Dr Perpetual Uke, a rheumatology consultant at Birmingham City Hospital, said that, when she woke and saw her bump had gone, she believed she had tragically lost the babies. Dr Uke was around six months pregnant when she began to feel unwell with Covid-19 symptoms in March, ending up on a ventilator at Birmingham's Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Palmer, a girl, and Pascal, a boy, were born on 10 April at just 26 weeks old, weighing only 770g and 850g. (Dr Perpetual Uke with her new born son Pascal outside their family home / Sky News) "I was delusional, I couldn't see my bump and I thought my babies were gone and all my family had died." The twins were cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit until they were 116 days old.

"They were so tiny they didn't look like my older kids, I couldn't touch them, I felt so emotional," she told Sky News. Yvonne Heward, head of neonatal nursing at Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Trust, said: "It was a very emotional time when Perpetual was treated in intensive care. The family were clapped out of the unit by an emotional team when they were finally able to leave the hospital. A Birmingham hospital consultant has given birth to twins while in a coma with coronavirus. The babies were delivered two months early at the doctor mother's place of work in Birmingham.

The consultant is back home after her premature twins were delivered by caesarean while she was on a ventilator with Covid. She was admitted to a ward at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham with Covid-19, after days of self-isolation. After a month in a coma, it was decided she was stable enough to have the twins delivered. She remained under the CCU's care for another two weeks, while husband Matthew spent time with the twins. She told Sky News: "I was pregnant at 24 to 25 weeks, at that stage, and by the time I woke up, I was so disorientated.

Yvonne Heward, Head of Neonatal Nursing at Birmingham Women's and Children's, said: "It was a very emotional time when Perpetual was treated in intensive care. Their journey has been miraculous and the day of their discharge home under the care of our Neonatal Community Outreach Team (NCOT) was very emotional indeed. The UK continues to post more than 500 Covid deaths a day, as the new figures from Wednesday took its total toll above 53,000. With increased pressure on hospitals amid the rising cases, one trust has been found to be ignoring national guidance on safe staffing and risking lives by increasing staff-to-patient ratios to dangerously high levels. Meanwhile, Boris Johnson's plan to allow a five-day festive "amnesty" from lockdown for families to gather at Christmas has worried public health officials, who say people may have to pay the price with weeks of tighter restrictions afterwards.

A hospital trust in Bristol has been accused of risking lives after raising its patient-to-nurse ward ratio to dangerously high levels, having allegedly dismissed staff concerns and national guidance on safe staffing. Britons could have to pay for a family Christmas with tougher coronavirus restrictions on either side of the festive break, government scientists have said. A fifth moved back home to save money so they could afford to pay their bills, while a further 31 per cent wanted to ensure they could be with their family for Christmas. Woman gives birth to twins while in Covid-19 coma A coronavirus patient who was pregnant with twins woke up from a medically-induced coma in hospital to find her babies had been delivered, and were alive and well. Perpetual Uke was around six months pregnant when she began to feel unwell with Covid-19 symptoms in March.

Ms Uke, a rheumatology consultant at Birmingham City Hospital, fell seriously ill and ended up on a ventilator in her own place of work. She was in the induced coma for almost a month, during which time doctors decided it would be safer for her and the twins if they were delivered prematurely by caesarean section. A woman who delivered twins while in a COVID-19 induced coma said she could not believe her babies were alive when she woke up after nearly one month. Dr Perpetual Uke, a rheumatology consultant at Birmingham City Hospital in the UK, was six months pregnant when she was taken to hospital suffering from COVID-19 in March. From there she was taken to an intensive care unit at the same hospital where she worked, and says that was the last she could remember. Dr Uke could not believe hospital staff when they told her the twins had been delivered by caesarean section on April 10 and that they were in the neonatal intensive care unit. "I thought I'd lost my pregnancy because I couldn't see my bump any more," she said. Her twins, Sochika and Osinachi, stayed in the neonatal unit for 116 days. Dr Uke remained in a coma for another two weeks after her babies were born. She says she gets emotional now when she looks at her twins and sees that they survived - and so did she. Perpetual Uke, left, says she couldn't believe she and her children survived. "Even when I woke up, when [the nurses] were telling me my twins were there, in the neonatal intensive care unit, I thought they were saying all those things to calm me down," she said. "Every passing day I was hoping my wife was not among those who are dead," he said. Now, the family is back at home and the children are getting better every day. "I had never wanted them to go through this difficult path at the start of their lives," Dr Uke said. Birmingham: A woman who gave birth to premature twins while she was in a coma with COVID-19 has woken up. Perpetual Uke, who works as a rheumatology consultant at Birmingham City Hospital, had fallen sick with flu-like symptoms in late March. She was taken to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital after which she went into a coma and was put on a ventilator. Her babies were born by caesarean section on April 10. When Uke came out of the coma, she thought that her children hadn't survived. "I was pregnant at 24 to 25 weeks, at that stage, and by the time I woke up, I was so disorientated. I was really worried," Uke told Sky News. She said, "Sometimes I look at them in tears, I never knew they would make it. Palmer, a girl, and Pascal, a boy, were born at just 26 weeks of Uke's pregnancy. Uke spent 16 days on the critical care unit before she could meet her newborns. "They were so tiny they didn't look like my older kids, I couldn't touch them, I felt so emotional," she said. All the time that Uke's husband Matthew took care of the premature twins and their older children Ronald and care, he was worried about his wife's life. "I had mixed feelings when the twins were brought out," he said. I was happy the twins were delivered but the thing is, is my wife coming home?" Uke and the twins were discharged from the hospital with applause from the staff.