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31 December 2020 18:32

Coronation Street Tracie Bennett Coronation Street

Tommy Docherty dead: Former Manchester United, Chelsea and Scotland manager dies aged 92

Former Manchester United, Chelsea, Aston Villa and Scotland manager Tommy Docherty has passed away after a long illness at the age of 92. Docherty began his playing career at Celtic but made his name playing more than 300 league games for Preston North End as a right-half in the 1950s. Finishing his career at Arsenal and then Chelsea, he also represented Scotland 25 times and was part of the squad that competed in the 1958 World Cup in Sweden. Docherty managed more than a dozen clubs including Chelsea, Villa, Porto, Derby and QPR. His four-and-a-half years at United saw him take the club back in to the old First Division and to successive FA Cup Finals in 1976 and 1977.

Former Manchester United, Chelsea and Scotland manager Tommy Docherty has died at 92 Docherty (centre) began his playing career at Celtic but made his name at Preston North End before finishing his career at Arsenal and then Chelsea OBITUARY: Tommy Docherty was the self-effacing manager who 'had more clubs than Jack Nicklaus' and joked he was the only boss to be sacked for falling in love... Docherty won 25 caps for Scotland and was part of the squad that competed in the 1954 and 1958 World Cups He may even, if you were to venture, throw in a light-hearted tale about his affair with Mary Brown, which ended his tenure as manager of Manchester United just days after winning the FA Cup. Docherty pictured with George Best during his five years in charge of Manchester United Stamford Bridge was where Docherty built another successful team, managing Chelsea between 1961 and 1967 Docherty won 25 Scotland caps and went to two World Cups, although he will be best remembered for a charismatic managerial career spanning 13 different clubs. Docherty spent 29 days in charge of QPR in 1968, between Rotherham and Aston Villa, and returned after leaving Derby in 1979. Yet, in the midst of all the restlessness, the quips and confrontations, Docherty created two fabulous teams during extended periods at Chelsea and Manchester United. At Chelsea in the '60s, where he ended his playing career, Docherty revived and revolutionised a club in decline with modern coaching techniques, and blooded young players from the successful youth team, including Ron Harris and Terry Venables.

United's 1977 FA Cup win was the highlight of his time at Old Trafford - he always believed more silverware would have followed if he'd stayed on as manager Docherty always said his Chelsea side would have won the league 'three or four times' had financial problems not forced them to sell young goal machine Jimmy Greaves to AC Milan for £80,000, just months before he took over from Ted Drake. They were challenging with Manchester United and Leeds when, in April, Docherty sent home eight players for breaking a curfew in Blackpool and, without them, lost 6-2. He was fired after an incident on an end-of-season Caribbean tour, soon after defeat against Tottenham in the FA Cup final in 1967 but his legacy at the Bridge stretched beyond the thrilling football and the foundations of the team which went on to win the FA Cup and European Cup Winners' Cup under Dave Sexton. He left the Scotland job to take over from his friend Frank O'Farrell at United and, despite relegation and a season in the second tier, Docherty was able to sever the ties to the past and instil new purpose. Back in the old Division One, they finished third and lost to Southampton in the FA Cup final and, a year later, won the FA Cup, beating Liverpool at Wembley to stop Bob Paisley's team claiming a Treble.

'If they'd kept me for another couple of years the trophies would have been rolling in,' said Docherty but his tenure ended abruptly when he informed the board that his marriage of 27 years to Agnes, with whom he had four children, was over and he was in love with Mary, the wife of United's physio Laurie Brown. The former Manchester United boss managed 12 clubs and the Scotland national team during the most colourful of careers. Docherty, who was known as 'The Doc', spent nine years as a player with Preston, and played for Scotland at the 1958 World Cup in Sweden, before a managerial career which took him to Portugal and Australia but is best remembered for a five-year spell at Old Trafford. Tommy Docherty (third from left) celebrates winning the 1977 FA Cup with Manchester United (PA). Tommy Docherty (right) after signing for Arsenal from Preston (PA).

He left for Preston in 1949 – the year in which he married his first wife Agnes – after failing to pin down a first-team spot, and said years later: "When I was a youngster, it was my one and only ambition to play in a green and white jersey. When I was transferred it was one of the great disappointments of my life." His time at Deepdale included an appearance in the 1954 FA Cup final and he won the first of his 25 Scotland caps, playing twice in the 1954 World Cup. In December 1972, with Scotland on their way to the 1974 World Cup finals in West Germany, he quit to take over at Manchester United. Tommy Docherty (centre) said his decision to quit the Scotland job was one of his biggest regrets (PA). Tommy Docherty leads Manchester United out at Wembley for the 1977 FA Cup final (PA). F ormer Manchester United, Chelsea and Scotland manager Tommy Docherty has died at the age of 92.

In a statement given to the Press Association, Docherty's family confirmed that 'The Doc' - one of football's most colourful and outspoken characters - had passed away peacefully at his home on New Year's Eve after a long illness. Docherty was manager at Manchester United between 1972-77, suffering relegation to the old Second Division before guiding the club back to the top-flight as champions at the first time of asking. He also led United to back-to-back FA Cup finals, with victory at Wembley in 1977 denying Bob Paisley's dominant Liverpool team a potential treble. "We are deeply saddened by the passing of Tommy Docherty, who led us to FA Cup victory in 1977 with a thrilling, attacking team in the best traditions of Manchester United," United said in a statement. Docherty began a 27-year managerial career that took in a total of 13 clubs as a player-coach at Chelsea in 1961, staying in west London for six years and guiding the club back to the First Division in addition to winning the 1965 League Cup and reaching the 1967 FA Cup final, losing to rivals Tottenham. Docherty also managed the Scottish national team between 1971-72 before leaving for Manchester United and had spells overseas with FC Porto in Portugal and Sydney Olympic and South Melbourne in Australia. As a player, he made over 300 appearances for Preston between 1949-58 - making an FA Cup Final and winning a Second Division title - and turned out 82 times for Arsenal in addition to playing for both Celtic and Chelsea. Former Manchester United and Scotland manager Tommy Docherty has passed away at the age of 92, his family have announced in a statement. 'The Doc' spent nine years playing for Preston and claimed 25 caps for Scotland, before moving into management. He is most famously remembered for his time in charge of United but he also was manager of Chelsea, Aston Villa and Derby. Docherty lifted the FA Cup as boss of United after famously defeating Bob Paisley's all-conquering Liverpool team in the 1977 Final. He left for Preston in 1949 - the year in which he married his first wife Agnes - after failing to pin down a first-team spot, and said years later: "When I was a youngster, it was my one and only ambition to play in a green and white jersey. His time at Deepdale included an appearance in the 1954 FA Cup final and he won the first of his 25 Scotland caps, playing twice in the 1954 World Cup. Former Manchester United and Scotland manager Tommy Docherty has died at the age of 92 following a long illness, it has been confirmed. Docherty, who was known as 'The Doc', spent nine years as a player with Preston, and won 25 caps for Scotland. He went on to manage 12 clubs - including Chelsea, Aston Villa and Derby - as well as a stint in charge of his country. But he was best known for his five-year spell at Old Trafford, overseeing an FA Cup final win over Bob Paisley's Liverpool in 1977. A family spokesperson said in a statement: "Tommy passed away peacefully surrounded by his family at home. United added in a statement: "We are deeply saddened by the passing of Tommy Docherty, who led us to FA Cup victory in 1977 with a thrilling, attacking team in the best traditions of Manchester United. "Tommy was a regular in the Scotland side in the 1950s that qualified for two World Cups, and his record as Scotland manager was impressive, albeit cut short by his decision to take the Manchester United job. Docherty began his playing career at Celtic, before spells with Preston, Arsenal and Chelsea, and the Hoops tweeted: "We are saddened to hear of the death of Tommy Docherty who spent two years with Celtic in the 1940s. A club statement on Twitter read: "Tommy was a legend of our game and our thoughts are with his family and close friends at this time."