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20 July 2020 20:33

Coronavirus Vaccine Coronavirus

Oxford coronavirus vaccine induces strong immune response, early trial results suggest

Professor Sarah Gilbert, of the University of Oxford, said: "There is still much work to be done before we can confirm if our vaccine will help manage the Covid-19 pandemic, but these early results hold promise. "As well as continuing to test our vaccine in phase-three trials, we need to learn more about the virus - for example, we still do not know how strong an immune response we need to provoke to effectively protect against Sars-Cov-2 infection. The Phase 1 and 2 trials showed encouraging results, and found that the vaccine is safe, causes few side effects and induces a strong immune response to the virus. The researchers explained: "By vaccinating with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, we are hoping to make the body recognise and develop an immune response to the Spike protein that will help stop the SARS-CoV-2 virus from entering human cells and therefore prevent infection." A coronavirus vaccine being developed by the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca is safe and shows signs of inducing an immune response, according to early clinical trial results published Monday in the medical journal The Lancet. Moderna, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based biotech company, published the phase 1 trial results of its vaccine last week, and announced plans to begin its final phase of human testing at the end of July.

In the phase 1 trial, researchers reported that all 45 volunteers developed antibodies key to fighting the coronavirus. The Covid-19 vaccine being developed at the University of Oxford is safe and induces an immune reaction, findings of the first phases of the study suggest. Professor Sarah Gilbert, of the University of Oxford, said: 'There is still much work to be done before we can confirm if our vaccine will help manage the Covid-19 pandemic, but these early results hold promise. 'As well as continuing to test our vaccine in phase-three trials, we need to learn more about the virus – for example, we still do not know how strong an immune response we need to provoke to effectively protect against Sars-Cov-2 infection. A team of scientists at the University of Oxford released promising results showing their COVID-19 vaccine appears safe in an early-stage study — welcome news for one of the most advanced vaccine programs in the world.

The Phase 1/2 results, published Monday in the scientific journal The Lancet, also showed that the vaccine triggered an immune system response, according to blood samples taken from study volunteers. "What we're reporting today is the result of a phase 1 trial in over 1000 people looking at how well this vaccine performs both in terms of its safety, which is good and its immune responses which are pretty exciting," Professor Adrian Hill, director of the Oxford Jenner Institute, told ABC News. This finding gives researchers a promising hint at the vaccine's effectiveness, but experts say only the results of an ongoing, massive Phase 3 study will show if the vaccine really works to protect people from COVID-19 infection. The Oxford vaccine is one of 23 vaccine candidates currently being tested in studies in people across the globe, according to the World Health Organization. New research finds that among people who have been infected and recovered from the virus, antibodies may fade more rapidly than we had hoped, prompting scientists to take a closer look at T cells, another virus-fighting part of the immune system.

A coronavirus vaccine candidate being developed by the University of Oxford in partnership with pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca is safe and activates an immune response in people, according to preliminary results from trials involving 1077 volunteers. It is not yet clear whether this vaccine candidate offers protection against infection with the coronavirus, and we won't know whether it can stop people from becoming ill with covid-19 until we see the results of larger trials. The UK's health minister Matt Hancock today ordered a review into how the daily coronavirus death figures are calculated, after a preliminary analysis revealed that the current method includes people who recovered from covid-19 and then died of another cause. A group of scientists are calling for young, healthy people to help accelerate vaccine research by volunteering to be exposed to the coronavirus in so-called "challenge trials." The process might make it easier to see how effective different vaccine candidates are at providing protection against covid-19. There are currently 23 coronavirus vaccine candidates in human trials, with three of them in or close to entering phase III, the final stage of testing.

A coronavirus vaccine candidate developed by US company Moderna and the US National Institutes of Health, a medical research organisation, is expected to become the first in the US to enter the final stage of clinical testing. Moderna plans to enter phase III clinical trials on 27 July, and hopes to test the vaccine on 30,000 people, including those whose circumstances put them at high-risk of getting infected with the coronavirus. All 45 volunteers who received the experimental vaccine as part of the phase I trial for safety were found to have developed antibodies against the coronavirus in their blood, and none had serious side effects. People should wear face coverings in shops and the government is looking at making it mandatory to do so in England, UK prime minister Boris Johnson said today.