loading...

22 October 2020 12:40

D-Day Remembrance poppy Rachel Riley

The public is being urged to find new ways to support this year's Poppy Appeal as the coronavirus pandemic limits the work of traditional fundraisers. Under the message "every poppy counts", The Royal British Legion (RBL) is encouraging people to back alternative ideas for showing support and raising money for current and ex-members of the armed forces who may be facing hardships, injuries or bereavements. The RBL's director of fundraising Claire Rowcliffe said the impact of the pandemic has meant veterans need support more than ever. She said: "Whilst the Covid-19 pandemic undoubtedly makes running the appeal more difficult, the additional hardships it has brought about means our work is now more vital than ever. Ways of supporting the appeal, that launches today, include making a request through the RBL's website for poppies to be sent in the post to be distributed among neighbours, families and friends while following social distancing guidelines.

The Tower of London poppy display - in pictures 28 show all The Tower of London poppy display - in pictures 1/28 Procession Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes, (C) and artist Paul Cummins (R) place the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day (Picture: Getty) 2/28 Sombre The last Post is sounded after Cadet Harry Hayes (third right) joins other dignitaries to plant the last poppy in the art installation (Picture: PA) 3/28 Ceremony Military cadet, Harry Hayes, places the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London (Picture: Getty) 4/28 Honour Military cadet Harry Hayes places the last ceramic poppy in the moat of the Tower of the London (Picture: Jeremy Selwyn) 5/28 Sea of red Sir Richard Dannatt reads the names of the fallen before the last poppy was placed (Picture: Jeremy Selwyn) 6/28 Attraction The crowd takes pictures of the poppies (Picture: REX) 7/28 Awe-inspiring David and Samantha Cameron look out over the display 8/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial The display was created by artist Paul Cummins (Picture: REUTERS) 9/28 Tower of London poppies There were reports of queues of over 90 minutes and overcrowding at the Tube station nearby Picture: Jeremy Selwyn 10/28 Tower of London poppies Thousands of people were queueing in the sun today Picture: Jeremy Selwyn 11/28 Tower of London poppies Crowds line up at the Tower of London in autumn sunshine today Picture: Jeremy Selwyn 12/28 Tower of London poppies The memorial display is proving a hit with members of the public Picture: Jeremy Selwyn 13/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial The "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" poppy memorial at the Tower of London. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) 21/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial Harry Mayhead, Pearly King of Bow Bells, looks at a poppy 22/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial Volunteers continue to install the ceramic poppies 23/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial Laura Hutchinson walks thoughtfully through the work at the Tower of London (Picture: Glenn Copus) 24/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial An aerial view of the poppies taken on August 28 (PA) 25/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial The memorial in early August (Picture: Rex Features) 26/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial How the project looked in July (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images) 27/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial The poppies in late July (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images) 28/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial Crawford Butler, the longest serving Yeoman Warden at the Tower of London, poses with the first ceramic poppy to be 'planted' (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) Dan Kitwood/Getty Images 1/28 Procession Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes, (C) and artist Paul Cummins (R) place the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day (Picture: Getty) 2/28 Sombre The last Post is sounded after Cadet Harry Hayes (third right) joins other dignitaries to plant the last poppy in the art installation (Picture: PA) 3/28 Ceremony Military cadet, Harry Hayes, places the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London (Picture: Getty) 4/28 Honour Military cadet Harry Hayes places the last ceramic poppy in the moat of the Tower of the London (Picture: Jeremy Selwyn) 5/28 Sea of red Sir Richard Dannatt reads the names of the fallen before the last poppy was placed (Picture: Jeremy Selwyn) 6/28 Attraction The crowd takes pictures of the poppies (Picture: REX) 7/28 Awe-inspiring David and Samantha Cameron look out over the display 8/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial The display was created by artist Paul Cummins (Picture: REUTERS) 9/28 Tower of London poppies There were reports of queues of over 90 minutes and overcrowding at the Tube station nearby Picture: Jeremy Selwyn 10/28 Tower of London poppies Thousands of people were queueing in the sun today Picture: Jeremy Selwyn 11/28 Tower of London poppies Crowds line up at the Tower of London in autumn sunshine today Picture: Jeremy Selwyn 12/28 Tower of London poppies The memorial display is proving a hit with members of the public Picture: Jeremy Selwyn 13/28 The Tower of London poppy memorial The "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" poppy memorial at the Tower of London. To mark this year's poppy appeal, which runs until Armistice Day on November 11, the RBL has launched a series of photographic portraits of armed forces members, Second World War veterans and Poppy Appeal collectors. The British public is being urged to find new ways to support this year's Poppy Appeal as the coronavirus pandemic limits the traditional work of its fundraising collectors. Social distancing requirements and shielding volunteers are among the challenges faced by armed forces charity The Royal British Legion (RBL) as it launches its annual campaign on Thursday.

But under the message "every poppy counts", it is encouraging people to back alternative ideas for showing their support while raising money for current and ex-members of the armed forces who may be facing hardships, injuries or bereavements. These include making a request through the RBL's website for poppies to be sent in the post to be distributed among neighbours, families and friends while following social distancing guidelines. To mark this year's appeal, which runs until Armistice Day on November 11, the RBL has launched a series of photographic portraits of armed forces members, Second World War veterans and Poppy Appeal collectors. Second World War veteran Ken Judd (Charlie Clift/Royal British Legion/PA) A limited number of people – including armed forces veterans, members of the royal family and international leaders – will be permitted to attend the service on November 8. Poppy Appeal organiser Flyle Hussain (Charlie Clift/Royal British Legion/PA) The RBL's director of fundraising Claire Rowcliffe said: "Whilst the Covid-19 pandemic undoubtedly makes running the appeal more difficult, the additional hardships it has brought about means our work is now more vital than ever.

"The pandemic has had a devastating impact on people's livelihoods and way of life, leaving some in the armed forces community in dire need of urgent help and support." THE POPPY Appeal has launched again in South Hampshire with communities asked to offer their support in a new way. The annual appeal, run by The Royal British Legion, to raise money for current and ex-service personnel, has been launched in the county today. With the threat of the Covid-19 pandemic still looming large, the legion are asking the public to support their fundraising in new ways. A spokesperson for the legion said: "The Appeal has to adapt to the threat of Covid-19 and we are asking the public to support us like never before. "Whilst the pandemic has impacted the ways in which we deliver the Poppy Appeal in South Hampshire, our community of staff, volunteers, partners and suppliers have been working together to ensure that the 2020 Poppy Appeal is able to go ahead.

Fundraising ideas are available online on The Royal British Legion website.