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04 September 2020 00:36

Dwayne Johnson Coronavirus Mario Series

David Graeber, Influential in Occupy Wall Street, Dies at 59

David Graeber, an American anthropologist and anarchist best known for authoring popular and accessible books about economic justice, passed away on Wednesday at the age of 59. The news of Graeber's passing — which was announced by his widow, the artist and writer Nika Dubrovksy, over Twitter — has shaken academics, readers and activists around the world. Although the cause of Graeber's death has not been announced at the time of this writing, Dubrovsky tweeted that he died at a hospital in Venice. Wolff, Professor of Economics Emeritus from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, told Salon by email that "David Graeber did original work carrying forward the tradition of thinking critically about capitalism and advocating for a better system. Born in 1961 to a father who fought with the Communists in the Spanish Civil War and to a mother who was a member of the international Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, Graeber began his career as an anthropologist, studying at SUNY-Purchase and the University of Chicago before doing two years of anthropological fieldwork in Madagascar on a Fulbright fellowship and teaching at Yale University.

At the same time that "Debt" became a hit, Graeber also attracted international attention as one of the organizers of Occupy Wall Street. Four years later Graeber published his next hit book, "The Utopia of Rules: On Technology, Stupidity, and the Secret Joys of Bureaucracy." Extending the idea from "Debt" that modern class structures are reinforced through violence, Graeber analyzed the history of bureaucratic thinking — tracing its modern incarnation to the Enlightenment, with its emphasis on rational thoughts and mathematics — and argued that wealthy countries today are dominated by public and private bureaucracies. These bureaucracies primarily serve financial interests like those on Wall Street, Graeber argued, and he called for Americans to actively oppose bureaucratic ways of thinking and instead embrace approaches that encourage creative and compassion. LONDON (AP) — David Graeber, who helped organize the Occupy Wall Street movement, has died in Venice, his agent said. His father was a printer in the days of offset presses and fought with the International Brigades against Gen. Francisco Franco's forces in the 1936-39 Spanish Civil War. His mother was a garment worker and homemaker who played the female lead in the 1930s musical "Pins & Needles,'' which celebrated the American labor movement.

But he was also a ``true intellectual'' whose work was influenced by many thinkers, activists and artists, his agent, Melissa Flashman, said Thursday when she confirmed his death. He is best known for his role in the Occupy Wall Street movement, a grassroots response to the 2008 financial crisis that sought to highlight how the richest 1% of the population dominated the U.S. economy. Graeber said he didn't personally come up with the movement's slogan "We are the 99%,'' but he did contribute to it. David Graeber, who helped organize the Occupy Wall Street movement, has died in Venice, his agent said. A professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics, Graeber studied anarchism and anti-capitalist movements, and challenged the world to respond to the plight of Kurds in the Middle East.

"David was a hugely influential anthropologist, political activist and public intellectual,″ said Professor Laura Bear, head of the anthropology department at LSE. His father was a printer in the days of offset presses and fought with the International Brigades against Gen. Francisco Franco's forces in the 1936-39 Spanish Civil War. His mother was a garment worker and homemaker who played the female lead in the 1930s musical "Pins & Needles,'' which celebrated the American labor movement. But he was also a "true intellectual" whose work was influenced by many thinkers, activists and artists, his agent, Melissa Flashman, said Thursday when she confirmed his death. He is best known for his role in the Occupy Wall Street movement, a grassroots response to the 2008 financial crisis that sought to highlight how the richest 1 percent of the population dominated the US economy. Anthropologist David Graeber, who worked on the initial stages of the Occupy Wall Street movement, has died in Venice at 59, his agent said.

A professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics, Graeber studied anarchism and anti-capitalist movements, and challenged the world to consider the plight of the Kurds in the Middle East. Graeber authored many books skewering aspects of modern society, including "Debt: The First 5,000 Years." He is perhaps best known for his role in the Occupy Wall Street movement, a grassroots response to the 2008 financial crisis that highlighted the domination of the economy by the richest 1% of the population. Born in New York, Graeber taught at Yale University before moving on to Goldsmiths, the University of London and finally the London School of Economics. © CNN Occupy Wall Street organizer David Graeber dies at 59 David Graeber, a professor and activist who helped organize the Occupy Wall Street movement, died in Venice on Wednesday, his agent told The Associated Press. Graeber, 59, was a professor at the London School of Economics (LSE), where he studied anarchism and anti-capitalist movements. "We are very shocked and saddened to learn of David Graeber's death," the LSE tweeted. David was a hugely influential anthropologist, political activist and public intellectual. His wife, Nika Dubrovsky, tweeted that Graeber died in a hospital in Venice but did not specify a cause. "Yesterday the best person in a world, my husband and my [email protected] died in a hospital in Venice," she tweeted. He was best known for his work organizing Occupy Wall Street, a grassroots response to the 2008 financial crisis, which, through a series of demonstrations, sought to point out economic inequalities in the country, particularly the fact that the richest 1 percent of the population dominated the U.S. economy.