loading...

30 June 2020 08:41

Gay pride Pride parade LGBT

MARSHA P Johnson, an American LGBTQ+ rights activist and performer, is celebrated by Google Doodle today. Johnson was born Malcolm Michaels Jr. on August 24, 1945, in New Jersey. After graduating high school in 1963, she moved to New York City's Greenwich Village, which had become a popular area for like-minded LGBTQ+ people to live. The 2012 documentary Pay It No Mind – The Life and Times of Marsha P. On June 30, 2019, Marsha was posthumously honoured as a grand marshal of the New York City Pride March.

Johnson is credited as one of the leaders of the 1969 Stonewall uprising— which was a vital turning point for the international LGBTQ+ rights movement. In 1970, she founded the Street Transvestite (now Transgender) Action Revolutionaries (STAR) with fellow transgender activist Sylvia Rivera. Her doodle is illustrated by Los Angeles-based guest artist Rob Gilliam. 4 Marsha has become an icon for LGBTQ+ rights Credit: Getty Images - Getty Google Doodle celebrates birthday of community activist SHIRTY PARTY Google Doodle celebrates International Vyshyvanka Day for embroided shirts Hero's birthday Google Doodle celebrates birthday of 'Britain's Schindler' Nicholas Winton GOOGLE GAMES Popular Google Doodle games - from Pac-Man to interactive Rubik's Cube MIND THE GAP The Google Doodle today pays tribute to public transport workers SAFE HANDS Google Doodle celebrates Ignaz Semmelweis and hand washing Celtic Cliffs For St. Patrick's day 2020, here's a look at the latest Google Doodle. In 2020 so far they've had Doodles celebrating Scottish astrophysicist genius Mary Somerville and Aids activist Nkosi Johnson, who died aged 12.

Google Honours LGBTQ+ iconic rights activist, Marsha P Johnson Marsha P Johnson, a pioneering figure in the LGBTQ+ rights movement is being celebrated for her unrelenting battle for respecting all lives. Google Doodle on June 30, closed Pride Month by paying respect to the icon. An illustration of her by Los Angeles-based guest artist Rob Gilliam is today's Doodle. Marsha P Johnson was an African-American, transgender woman from New Jersey. Marsha P Johnson's life She was born as Malcolm Michaels Jr. on August 24, 1945, in New Jersey.

New York City's Greenwich Village, where she spent her time, was a cultural hub for LGBTQ+ people. Malcolm Michaels Jr. legally changed name and became Marsha P. Johnson and the middle name 'P' apparently was her answer to all who questioned her gender: "Pay It No Mind." A charismatic figure, she was a self-declared drag queen. In June of 1969, the police in New York, raided a gay bar called 'The Stonewall Inn.' Around 200 people were dragged out of the bar and beaten up. Marsha P Johnson was 23 at that time. Violent protests followed and for the first time, gay people came out on the road marching for their rights. Marsha P Johnson's work She was a founding member of the Gay Liberation Front and also co-founded the activist group Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.), along with close friend Sylvia Rivera. Marsha P Johnson performed on stage with the troupe, Hot Peaches. Marsha P Johnson: 5 inspiring quotes Agencies Early concepts and sketches of the doodle by guest artist Rob Gilliam. Safety Nets, Cookie Control & Secure DNS: Follow These Simple Google Chrome Hacks To Keep D... Play Slideshow Chrome Pet Peeves 22 May, 2020 Google Chrome, in all probability, might be the most commonly-used browser, but it has been at the centre of criticism due to controversial changes, security problems and data concerns.From Chrome 79 accidentally deleting data for Android users in December 2019, Chrome 80's 'high level vulnerabilities' that put data at risk to the controversial deep linking upgrade in February 2020 that allegedly compromised on privacy, Chrome has often left its users worried about their safety and security.However, Chrome has now put all the privacy and security concerns to rest with its new upgrade. Here are some of them: Google Chrome, in all probability, might be the most commonly-used browser, but it has been at the centre of criticism due to controversial changes, security problems and data concerns.From Chrome 79 accidentally deleting data for Android users in December 2019, Chrome 80's 'high level vulnerabilities' that put data at risk to the controversial deep linking upgrade in February 2020 that allegedly compromised on privacy, Chrome has often left its users worried about their safety and security.However, Chrome has now put all the privacy and security concerns to rest with its new upgrade. Here are some of them: Next Control Cookies In Incognito 22 May, 2020 Most of us use the incognito mode in Google Chrome for private browsing. Most of us use the incognito mode in Google Chrome for private browsing. The USP of Google's incognito mode is that it does not save history, information entered by the user in forms or browser cookies. The good folks at Google have now decided to take security and privacy in incognito mode a notch higher.You can now control whether you wish to allow third-party cookies in incognito mode. Chrome will now block third-party cookies by default in incognito mode. If you wish to allow third-party cookies for specific sites, you can click the 'eye' sign on the address bar.The feature, as per Google's blog, will be gradually rolled out. For the uninitiated, third-party cookies allow websites to track a user across the web. With Chrome's new update, you can keep your information secure by blocking these cookies. To combat the menace, Google Chrome now has a security update that users can opt for. Called 'Enhanced Safe Browsing', this security upgrade will allow Chrome to proactively detect phishing attacks, malware and other web based threats.Chrome will do this by proactively checking if pages and downloads are dangerous by sending information about them to Google Safe Browsing.Going forward, Google will also add more protections to this upgrade such as tailored warnings for phishing sites, file downloads, cross product alerts and more. Another security upgrade that Chrome has come up to protect your privacy is 'Secure DNS'. This step is called DNS (Domain Name System) lookup.Google Chrome's Secure DNS feature will encrypt this step using 'DNS-over-HTTPS'. Next Safety Net 22 May, 2020 Apart from introducing strong security measures to keep attackers at bay, Google has also developed a safety net for its users. Apart from introducing strong security measures to keep attackers at bay, Google has also developed a safety net for its users. NEW DELHI: Today in 2019, self-identified drag queen Marsha P. Johnson was posthumously honoured as a grand marshal of the New York City Pride March. Tech giant Google celebrated the LGBTQ+ rights activist and performer with a creative doodle as a part of Pride Month this year.The doodle, which shows Marsha in her colourful ensemble against a backdrop of the Pride colours, was illustrated by Los Angeles-based guest artist Rob Gilliam.Gilliam, who is a queer person of colour himself, said that the doodle was inspired by 'Johnson's vibrant personality' and New York's iconic architecture that she proudly marched through along with her colleagues. The artist had also created different concepts and sketches of the doodle.Johnson was born on August 24, 1945 as Malcolm Michaels Jr in Elizabeth, New Jersey. After graduating high school in 1963, she moved to NYC's Greenwich Village, a burgeoning cultural hub for LGBTQ+ people. She then legally changed her name to Marsha P Johnson. Her middle initial — 'P' — allegedly stood for her response to those who questioned her gender - 'Pay It No Mind'."A beloved and charismatic fixture in the LGBTQ+ community, Johnson is credited as one of the key leaders of the 1969 Stonewall uprising — widely regarded as a critical turning point for the international LGBTQ+ rights movement. The following year, she founded the Street Transvestite (now Transgender) Action Revolutionaries (STAR) with fellow transgender activist Sylvia Rivera. STAR was the first organization in the U.S. to be led by a trans woman of color and was the first to open North America's first shelter for LGBTQ+ youth," Google Doodle's website said in a statement.In 2019, New York City announced plans to erect statues of Johnson and Rivera in Greenwich Village, which will be one of the world's first monuments in honor of transgender people.Google also thanked Johnson for inspiring people everywhere to stand up for the freedom to be themselves.The Marsha P.