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03 September 2020 10:43

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Find out how long you'll live with calculator that predicts your age of death

Thank you for subscribing See our privacy notice Invalid Email She continued: "The results of our analysis are translated into life expectancies for 648 different risk profiles based on age, sex and postcode. Don't miss our must-read newsletter Sign up Thank you for subscribing We have more newsletters Show me See our privacy notice Invalid Email The calculator, dubbed Mylongevity, shows the effect of various medical and lifestyle factors on life expectancy. Professor Elena Kulinskaya, who led the development of the app, said: "People are interested in their life expectancy, but it is not just out of morbid curiosity. To use the calculator, simply input your data, including your name, age, gender, any underlying health conditions, and whether or not you smoke. Professor Kulinskaya said: "The software we have developed is based on our research using electronic health records.

Professor Kulinskaya added: "We are confident that the key application of our tool - helping to show the relative effects of such things as smoking - is largely unaffected, but we plan to fine tune it to explore life expectancy changes caused by the pandemic." Overall, the researchers hope the calculator could prove useful for GPs to help people make lifestyle changes to improve their life expectancy. App uses medical and lifestyle factors to predict how long a person has to live The MyLongevity life expectancy calculator provides a 'relatively precise' prediction for how long a person has to live based on their health history and info from anonymous health records and the ONS Researchers have created a new web app informed by both personal medical and lifestyle information, and anonymised health records to predict a person's life expectancy. A user is required to input data including their age, sex, ethnicity, weight, where they live and health information, such as whether they smoke or if they have a history of high cholesterol or diabetes. This is combined with anonymised health records, life expectancy figures from the Office for National Statistics and the University of East Anglia's (UAE) research into cardiovascular disease and the benefits of statin use to calculate a projected life expectancy. "It can also help people improve their life expectancy by making healthy lifestyle changes." From this, the researchers were able to create 648 risk profiles based on age, sex and postcode, coupled with risk factors including the risk of a cardiac event within 10 years and use of statins.

Life expectancies for people aged under 60 were calculated by working on the assumption they'd live to the age retaining all the current demographic and health characteristics. The MyLongevity life expectancy calculator provides an average life expectancy prediction that is "reasonably precise" that may give people useful food for thought, Prof Kulinskaya told i. Researchers from the University of East Anglia have developed a new app that shows the effect of various medical and lifestyle factors on life expectancy. The Mylongevity app uses big data from anonymised electronic health records to calculate life expectancy – taking into account socio-demographic and health characteristics such as chronic diseases. The calculations are based on UK life expectancy figures published by the Office for National Statistics, and refined using UEA research on cardiovascular disease and the benefits of statin use.

We are confident that the key application of our tool – helping to show the relative effects of such things as smoking – is largely unaffected, but we plan to fine tune it to explore life expectancy changes caused by the pandemic," she added. The app could prove useful for GPs to help people make lifestyle changes, as well as for actuaries and demographers. 5 The new Life Expectancy Calculator requires information about your health and lifestyle Credit: University of East Anglia Experts at the University of East Anglia (UAE) developed the MyLongevity app using anonymous health records. Lead researcher Prof Elena Kulinskaya, from UEA's School of Computing Sciences, said: "People are interested in their life expectancy, but it is not just out of morbid curiosity. "It can also help people improve their life expectancy by making healthy lifestyle changes," she added.

The results produced by the app are based on UK life expectancy figures published by the Office for National Statistics. "The results of our analysis are translated into life expectancies for 648 different risk profiles based on age, sex and postcode." Prof Kulinskaya added that the list of risk factors the team used included hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, BMI, the risk of a cardiac event within 10 years, smoking status and statin use.