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05 November 2020 20:30

Guy Fawkes Night Fireworks Auckland

Sign up to FREE email alerts from LancsLive - daily Subscribe Thank you for subscribing See our privacy notice Invalid Email The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has brought about a very different form of Bonfire Night celebrations. Fireworks displays across Lancashire and England had been scrapped well in advance of the new national lockdown until December 2. (Image: Leyland Round Table) Bonfire Night: It wont be a great evening for visibility, with rain and cloud expected all evening. Temperatures will sit between nine and 11 degrees Celsius with low wind. Friday, November 6: Better visibility with a partly cloudy evening predicted.

It'll be colder, with temperatures between seven and eight degrees Celsius. Saturday, November 7: Another cloudy evening is on the way, with even cooler temperatures between six and seven degrees Celsius. Bonfire Night: It'll be a cloudy evening with not great visibility. Friday, November 6: Partially cloudy in the early evening before getting worse as the night progresses. It'll be cold with seven degrees Celsius expected.

(Image: Blackpool Pleasure Beach) Bonfire Night: Overcast and nothing much else. It'll be mild, with temperatures of 11 degrees Celsius. Friday, November 6: A clear evening is expected and with that temperatures of five degrees Celsius. Saturday, November 7: Clouds will return for the day, with temperatures of seven degrees Celsius. Bonfire Night: A cloudy and overcast evening with temperatures of 10 degrees Celsius.

Friday, November 6: It'll be clear, which will be music to firework fans ears Temperatures will drop to five degrees Celsius,. (Image: Clitheroe Cricket Club) Bonfire Night: It'll be a cloudy and overcast evening with not great visibility. Temperatures will sit between eight and nine degrees Celsius. Friday, November 6: Partially cloudy and clear throughout the night. It'll be cold with lows of five degrees Celsius expected. Saturday, November 7: Another partially cloudy night so those fireworks should be visible. Wrap up warm as it'll be around six degrees Celsius. For the latest news and breaking news visit the LancsLive website. To keep updated, follow LancsLive on Facebook and @LiveLancs on Twitter. Contact our newsdesk on [email protected] Bonfire Night celebrations contaminate our air with hugely elevated amounts of soot, scientists have discovered. Researchers from the University of Leeds tested air quality during Guy Fawkes Night events in the city – and found soot in the atmosphere was around 100 times its normal level. Soot, or black carbon, is produced by incomplete combustion. Black carbon particles are so small, they can penetrate deep into the lungs and cause irritation. Long term exposure can cause harmful effects on the heart and lungs and contributes to millions of deaths worldwide each year. “Our measurements showed that the elevated concentrations of soot and other pollutants in the atmosphere should be a warning to those with pre-existing health conditions...” Mike Adams, PhD student, School of Earth and Environment The team took hourly air quality samples on the university campus during Bonfire Night celebrations in 2016 and 2017. Equipment was set up on the School of Earth and Environment balcony, 15m from ground level and more than 0.5 km from any individual bonfires or firework displays, to give a representative view of the air quality across the city. The researchers did not expect to see such high levels of the polluting matter in the atmosphere. Lead author Michael Adams, Research Fellow in Atmospheric Ice Nucleation and PhD student in the School of Earth and Environment, said: “Our measurements showed that the elevated concentrations of soot and other pollutants in the atmosphere should be a warning to those with pre-existing health conditions, as the aerosol particles are in the size range where they can enter the lungs and cause problems.” An air filter before and after the experiment, showing the amount of polluting materials collected on Bonfire Night 2017. Research supervisor Benjamin Murray, Professor of Atmospheric Science in Leeds’ School of Earth and Environment, said: “Bonfire Night is a massive pollution event across the UK. People with existing health problems, such as heart and lung conditions, are at increased risk. “I was surprised to see levels of black carbon so persistently high for so long on multiple nights. It was striking how poor air quality was on Bonfire Night.” Weather conditions can affect how long the particles remain in the air. But in 2017 the air was relatively still and the pollution lingered into the next day. While providing insight into the levels of black carbon emitted on Bonfire Night, the team’s discoveries have also contributed to the understanding of different sources of ice nucleating particles – a key research area in climate science. Ice occurs naturally in clouds, but tiny particles of desert dust, soil dust, fungus and bacteria swept high into the air can cause supercooled water droplets in clouds to freeze around them. High concentrations of these ice-nucleating particles can cause clouds to freeze, potentially impacting the earth’s climate. “Clouds containing supercooled water and ice are first order importance for climate.” Benjamin Murray, Professor of Atmospheric Science, School of Earth and Environment Black carbon is known to cause climate warming, but its impact on clouds was not clear. The researchers discovered black carbon produced on Bonfire Night did not act as ice nucleating particles. Professor Murray said: “Clouds containing supercooled water and ice are first order importance for climate. Vast cloud systems made of a mixture of ice and water over the world’s oceans buffer the warming effect of CO2. “But the buffering capacity depends on how much ice is in them, which in turn depends on the concentration and distribution of ice nucleating particles. “We found that aerosol particles emitted during the celebration are not as effective at nucleating ice as aerosol particle already present in the atmosphere. “We conclude that aerosol particles emitted from combustion processes such as those observed on Bonfire Night are not an important source of ice nucleating particles.” Lead picture: Bonfire Night (Aurelien Guichard on Flickr) The paper: "A major combustion aerosol event had a negligible impact on the atmospheric ice-nucleating particle population" is published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 05 November 2020. Sign up to the Hull Live newsletter for daily updates and breaking news Sign up here! Thank you for subscribing See our privacy notice Invalid Email With tight Covid restrictions in place across the UK, Bonfire Night will look very different this year. Public displays have been cancelled this year because of the pandemic. Many of us are used to wrapping up warm for our local fireworks display, but cancelled events don't have to mean missing out on Guy Fawkes Night entirely. A pretty, fun and affordable way of joining in the fun of Bonfire Night. Although sparklers are safer than fireworks, make sure you're still being sensible with them – only light one at a time, wear gloves when handling them, dispose of them responsibly, supervise children, and don't give them to children under the age of five. If you're spending a bit more time at home, you could have the opportunity to really experiment with your Bonfire Night spread. The cold weather calls for hearty, filling and delicious food – we're thinking a rich, smoky chilli, or classic hot dogs with all the trimmings. Of course, no Guy Fawkes Night is complete without those toffee apples, and they are achievable at home – try this recipe from Tesco for a very sweet treat. No November 5 feast would be complete without the right drinks. For other warming drinks that are definitely for adults only, check out this BBC Good Food recipe for mulled cider, or this Epicurious recipe for a hot toddy. Fireworks displays are the true hero of Bonfire Night – who can resist the loud bangs, flashing lights and inevitability of Katy Perry's Firework blasting over the speakers? One thing we don't relish though is just how freezing cold you get standing out in your local park. Luckily, this year you can still catch some fireworks – but without your toes going numb. Organisations like Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service will be hosting a virtual event on their Facebook page, so you don't have to miss out on fireworks and bonfires completely this year. If your children are sad about missing the traditional fireworks display this year, you can still get into the spirit of things at home with the help of arts and crafts. Maybe get the whole family painting their best bonfires, creating fireworks out of pipe cleaners, or even putting together your very own Guy Fawkes scarecrow out of ice lolly sticks.