loading...

14 October 2020 00:30

Harry Gration BBC Look North Yorkshire

He said: "I've worked with the best of the best and leave Look North in the good hands of Amy and the team, although I don't know how Paul Hudson is going to cope without me checking his forecasts. BBC Look North presenter Harry Gration MBE has decided to leave the broadcaster after 42 years. The presenter of BBC One's Yorkshire bulletins will have his last evening on the iconic red sofa on Wednesday, October 21. The Director of BBC England, Helen Thomas, said Harry was a "broadcasting legend", adding: "He is a true professional, a Yorkshire treasure and it has been a privilege to work alongside him." Harry said: "For the past four decades, it's been a privilege to meet the people of the county I love. "I've worked with the best of the best and leave Look North in the good hands of Amy and the team, although I don't know how Paul Hudson is going to cope without me checking his forecasts!

Harry, who is Yorkshire born and bred, began filing match reports for the BBC while working as a history teacher in the mid '70s. He has covered nine Olympic Games for the BBC and won two Royal Television Society awards for his sports documentaries: 'White Rose in Africa' in 1992 and 'Dickie Bird: A Rare Species' in 1997. Harry continued: "I've interviewed every Prime Minister since Margaret Thatcher, covered every major Look North story even at the expense of my holidays, and I wouldn't have changed a thing. She said: "It has been an absolute honour to share the red sofa with Harry for the past seven years: a Yorkshire legend, a mentor and a dear friend. "Helen Thomas, Director of BBC England, who has worked with Harry for 15 years, said: "To call Harry a broadcasting legend would be an understatement.

"I'd like to pass on my personal sincere thanks to Harry for being the trusted voice and face of Look North for so many years – he is a true professional, a Yorkshire treasure and it has been a privilege to work alongside him." Amy Garcia will be lead presenter for the 6.30pm evening news on BBC Look North, which reaches more than 2 million people in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire each week. Harry Gration full interview - Why I decided to step down from BBC Look North hot seat Exclusive: The BBC Look North presenter Harry Gration MBE has opened up to The Yorkshire Post about his "traumatic" decision to leave the broadcaster after 42 years, Ruth Dacey reports. Yorkshire broadcasting legend Harry Gration to leave the BBC after 42 years. The 69-year-old has become a Yorkshire institution after fronting the corporation's Look North programme for most of the last 38 years. For the last seven, he has shared the screen with Amy Garcia, who will now continue to front the show on her own following Gration's last show next Wednesday (October 21) - the day before his 70th birthday. Pictured BBC Look North Presenters Harry Gration (right) and Amy Garcia. The announcement follows on from BBC cutbacks, announced in July, that will see Look North reduced to a single presenter and fewer hosts on local radio stations. Mr Gration, 69, said: "Obviously the BBC needs to make significant savings - that clearly played a part but this seems to be the right time to do it as well and have a little bit of time to do different things." Harry joined the BBC in 1978 and has presented Look North since 1982. TV legend Harry Gration said: "I like to look at the good things. He said: "For the past four decades, it's been a privilege to meet the people of the county I love. "I've worked with the best of the best and leave Look North in the good hands of Amy and the team, although I don't know how (BBC weatherman) Paul Hudson is going to cope without me checking his forecasts. "I'm looking forward to some new broadcasting adventures and some special time with my family and a certain one-year-old." He added: "I've interviewed every prime minister since Margaret Thatcher, covered every major Look North story even at the expense of my holidays, and I wouldn't have changed a thing. "Stand-out moments include raising over £800,000 on a tandem, pushing a sofa and being tied to Paul (Paul Hudson, the weather presenter): three challenges my body will never forget." The Director of BBC England, Helen Thomas, said Harry was a "broadcasting legend", adding: "He is a true professional, a Yorkshire treasure and it has been a privilege to work alongside him. Bradford-born Gration joined the BBC in 1978 after working as a history teacher, and joined Look North in 1982, although he left for a spell working on BBC South Today in the 1990s. He covered nine Olympic Games for the BBC and won two Royal Television Society (RTS) awards for his sports documentaries: White Rose In Africa in 1992 and Dickie Bird: A Rare Species in 1997. Harry said he had concerns for the future of broadcasting and maintaining "standards" amid both national and regional cutbacks in the industry. "But at the moment, my colleagues are working through extreme challenges, just as they are at The Yorkshire Post and similair organisations to make sure that the programme and the paper goes out. Yorkshire-born Harry began filing match reports for the BBC while working as a history teacher in the mid '70s. He said: "One of the things I've loved more than anything is to get to really understand and appreciate what the Yorkshire sense of humour is, and the Yorkshire character and that is something which will live with me for ever really and the kindness of people. Many will remember Harry fondly for his inspiring charity work, which saw him undertake several exhausting challenges for BBC Children in Need and BBC Sport Relief, raising hundreds of thousands of pounds for good causes and cheered on in person by thousands of viewers. These included pushing a sofa around Yorkshire and walking 120 miles with one leg strapped to weather presenter Paul Hudson. Amy Garcia said: "It has been an absolute honour to share the red sofa with Harry for the past seven years: a Yorkshire legend, a mentor and a dear friend. "Look North is a family and Harry has been at the heart of it for so long. Harry added: "Thank you to my audience for being so loyal, they've been with me through the good times and the bad times, when I was poorly and they have been fantastic and they've been fantastic - I've never forgotten that. I just hope the people who continue to work for Look North will have a passion for this county the way I have. "I like to look at the good things.