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11 January 2020 02:43

His recording career with Rush began with the band’s second album, “Fly by Night,” in 1975.

neil peart

He hadn't been interested in early piano lessons, but at 13 he began taking drum lessons and found that drumming was "pure pleasure," he told the magazine. "I'd come home every day from school and play along with the radio." After playing in rock bands during his teens, he moved to England at 18. But in 1972 he returned to Canada, where he worked at his father's farm-equipment dealership and played with local bands. In 1974, an audition got him into Rush. He became the band's lyricist, he said in 1980, "just because the other two guys didn't want to write lyrics." He added that he considered the band's lyrics "secondary" to the music.

Neil Peart, Drummer and Lyricist for Rush, Dies at 67

"A lot of times you just think of a lyrical idea as a good musical vehicle," he said. Mr. Peart grew up as a fan of loud, flashy drummers like Keith Moon, Gene Krupa, John Bonham and Ginger Baker, and he was known for hitting his drum kit hard. But as his playing developed, he quickly earned a reputation for precisely conceived, meticulously executed drum parts. He expanded the standard drum kit with double bass drums and a wide array of cymbals, woodblocks, bells and tympani, and he eventually added electronic percussion to his arsenal when it suited the music. His recording career with Rush began with the band's second album, "Fly by Night," in 1975. His approach immediately transformed the music from blues-based hard rock to compositions that were more demanding, ambitious and changeable. Rush's 1976 album, "2112," began with a 20-minute, seven-part title track.