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21 March 2020 06:33

Hypersonic speed The Pentagon United States Department of Defense

hypersonic speed

[VIDEO] US Hypersonic Nuclear Missile That Can Travel Faster Than Sound Tested by Pentagon; Is America Up to Something?

In fact, today, Mar. 20, the US Pentagon officially announced that the army has now successfully test-driven its newest and possibly the most powerful nuclear weapon ever built in the country, a prototype hypersonic missile that can travel up to five times the speed of sound. Today, Mar. 20, the US Pentagon released a video of its successful launch of an unarmed prototype of a hypersonic missile that is nuclear-capable, reportedly added in order to advance the country's nuclear war weapons. According to the agency, the test glide vehicle can fly in a designated target at an impressive speed of more than five times the speed of sound or called Mach 5. Impressively, this nuclear missile has more powerful abilities to be much "faster than current nuclear-capable ballistic and cruise missiles at low altitudes, can switch direction in flight and do not follow a predictable arc like conventional missiles, making them much harder to track and intercept." Reports suggest that this hypersonic nuclear-capable missile can be a preparation for missile warfare between the US and other military countries like North Korea, Russia, or even China. As explained by the South China Morning Post, though the hypersonic missile is still unarmed as of now, the image of the US having this powerful nuclear-capable missile can trigger an alarm to its military enemies--which may suggest that it could be preparing for the next World War or the World War 3.

advanced hypersonic weapon

"There is increasing investment in and deployment of hypersonic weapons that will severely limit response times available to targeted nations and create a dangerous degree of ambiguity and uncertainty," written in "Doomsday Clock," assessment made by the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. America has not yet explained why the army continues to develop and advanced its arms race. What's clear is that the country just added a huge budget to the development of hypersonic programs for the year 2021. The US Defence Department requested US$3.2 billion for hypersonic programs for fiscal 2021 budget and can raise from US$2.6 billion in the current year. The US has tested an unarmed hypersonic weapon in Hawaii, the US Department of Defence (DOD) has confirmed.

hypersonic speed

The Pentagon said the test of the hypersonic glide body late on Thursday was a success. The US Missile Defence Agency (MDA) "monitored and gathered tracking data from the flight experiment that will inform its ongoing development of systems designed to defend against adversary hypersonic weapons," it said in a statement. Hypersonic weapons are designed to evade modern defences by flying at five times the speed of sound or faster. The Navy and Army jointly executed Thursday's launch which "flew at hypersonic speed to a designated impact point," the Pentagon said in the statement. The Pentagon, which tested a similar hypersonic missile in 2017, has a goal of fielding hypersonic warfighting capabilities in the early to mid-2020s.

The United States announced Friday it has successfully tested an unarmed prototype of a hypersonic missile, a nuclear-capable weapon that could accelerate the arms race between superpowers. The Pentagon said a test glide vehicle flew at hypersonic speeds--more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5--to a designated impact point. The test followed the first joint US Army and Navy flight experiment in October 2017, when the prototype missile demonstrated it could glide in the direction of a target at hypersonic speed. "Today we validated our design and are now ready to move to the next phase towards fielding a hypersonic strike capability," Vice Admiral Johnny Wolfe said in a statement. Hypersonic weapons can take missile warfare, particularly nuclear warfare, to a new--and, for many, frightening--level. They can travel much faster than current nuclear-capable ballistic and cruise missiles at low altitudes, can switch direction in flight and do not follow a predictable arc like conventional missiles, making them much harder to track and intercept. The Pentagon is pressing to catch up with rivals Moscow and Beijing in the race to develop hypersonics, even as it recognizes they could dangerously raise the risks of a nuclear conflict, as countries struggle to build defenses against them. In its fiscal 2021 budget the US Defense Department requested $3.2 billion for hypersonic programs, up from $2.6 billion in the current year. The test was for the military's common-hypersonic glide body, or C-HGB weapon, designed to be launched from a rocket that could be land-, air- or sea-based. "The glide body tested today is now ready for transition to Army and Navy weapon system development efforts," said Mike White, the assistant director of the hypersonics program. Last October it displayed its DF-17 hypersonic glide vehicle in its national day military parade. "There is increasing investment in and deployment of hypersonic weapons that will severely limit response times available to targeted nations and create a dangerous degree of ambiguity and uncertainty," it said.