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14 October 2019 00:52

Joseph Antoine Ferdinand Plateau

Google Doodle celebrates Physicist Joseph Plateau who led to the birth of Cinema

Google Doodle celebrated what would have been the 218th birthday of Belgian physicist Joseph Antoine Ferdinand Plateau, inventor of the phénakistiscope, a device that led to the birth of cinema by creating the illusion of a moving image. "Inspired by the mesmerizing animated discs, the animated Doodle art was made to reflect Plateau's style, with different imagery and themes in them on different device platforms," read Google's description of the Doodle. At the age of six, the young Plateau was declared a child prodigy as he was able to read. He worked as a professor of experimental physics at Ghent University alongside his son Felix Plateau and his son-in-law Gustaaf Van der Mensbrugghe who would later become his biographer. 1586: Mary, Queen of Scots, goes on trial in England, accused of conspiring against Queen Elizabeth I.

1939: British battleship Royal Oak is sunk in Scapa Flow with the loss of 800 lives in World War II. Joseph Antoine Ferdinand Plateau, Belgian physicist (1801-1883); Eamon De Valera, Irish statesman (1882-1975); Dwight D Eisenhower, US general and 34th president (1890-1969); Lillian Gish, US actor (1896-1993); Sir Roger Moore, English actor (1927-2017); Mobutu Sese Seko, president of Zaire (1930-1997); Farah Pahlavi, former empress of Iran (1938); Ralph Lauren, US fashion designer (1939); Sir Cliff Richard, British singer (1940); Justin Hayward, British singer-musician of The Moody Blues fame (1946); Beth Daniel, US golfer (1956); Pete Murray, Australian singer-songwriter (1969); Floyd Landis, US cyclist (1975); Usher, US singer (1978); Mia Wasikowska, Australian actor (1989). Google Doodle celebrates the 218th birthday of Belgian physicist Joseph Antoine Ferdinand Plateau whose research on visual perception led him to invent a device named phénakistiscope which led to the birth of cinema. phénakistiscope created an illusion of a moving image which was pivotal to the birth and growth of motion picture. Initially, Plateau studied law but later studied physiological optics, emphasizing particularly on the effect of light and color on the human retina which made him one of the best-known scientists of the 19th century.

Born in 1801, his dissertation focussed on how images form on the retina, noting their exact duration, color, and intensity. He created a stroboscopic device in 1832 based on these conclusions in which two discs rotated in opposite directions. Plateau's productive career continued as a professor of experimental physics at Ghent University with the help of colleagues that included his son Felix Plateau and his son-in-law Gustaaf Van der Mensbrugghe despite him losing his vision in the later years of his life. Today's Google Doodle was inspired from Plateau's discs which reflect his style with different imagery and themes in them on different device platforms. Google Doodle on Monday celebrated the Belgian physicist Joseph Antoine Ferdinand Plateau 218th birthday of Belgian physicist Joseph Antoine Ferdinand Plateau, inventor of the phénakistiscope, a device that led to the birth of cinema by creating the illusion of a moving image.

Inspired by the mesmerizing animated discs, the animated Doodle art was made to reflect Plateau's style, with different imagery and themes in them on different device platforms. Born in Brussels on this day in 1801, Plateau was the son of an accomplished artist who specialized in painting flowers. After studying law, young Plateau became one of the best-known Belgian scientists of the nineteenth century, remembered for his study of physiological optics, particularly the effect of light and color on the human retina. Plateau's doctoral dissertation detailed how images form on the retina, noting their exact duration, color, and intensity. Based on these conclusions, he was able to create a stroboscopic device in 1832, fitted with two discs that rotated in opposite directions.

When both discs turned at exactly the right speed, the images seemed to merge, creating the illusion of a dancer in motion. Though Plateau lost his vision later in life, he continued to have a productive career in science even after becoming blind, working as a professor of experimental physics at Ghent University with the help of colleagues that included his son Felix Plateau and his son-in-law Gustaaf Van der Mensbrugghe. Today Plateau is known for being one of the first people to demonstrate the illusion of a moving image. Google dedicates Doodle to Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau, the inventor of phénakistiscope New Delhi, Oct 14: Today's Google Doodle is dedicated to Belgian physicist Joseph Antoine Ferdinand Plateau, whose invention phenakistiscope led to the birth of cinema. He was the first to demonstrate that if images of different stages of action are shown one after the other in a short span of time, then the human mind would perceive it as continuous motion or a moving picture (video as we know it today).

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Today would have been Antoine Ferdinand Plateau's 218th birthday. His invention, phénakistiscope, and the very concept that the illusion of movement can be created by repeatedly showing pictures of different stages of action were groundbreaking. One of the first commercially successful devices, invented by the Belgian Joseph Plateau in 1832, was the phenakistoscope, a spinning cardboard disk that created the illusion of movement when viewed in a mirror. The projection of stroboscopic photographs, creating the illusion of motion, eventually led to the development of cinema. Joseph Antoine Ferdinand Plateau' life: Born in Brussels, he studied at the University of Liège (Liège), where he graduated as a doctor of physical and mathematical sciences in 1829. Plateau's doctoral dissertation explored how images form on the retina.