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19 October 2020 00:33

London Bridge Terrorism Narwhal

It was because of this attack, Steve Gallant was convicted of murder and sent away for 17 years. That is, until he received a pardon from Her Majesty the Queen on for the part Gallant played during the London Bridge terror attack in 2019, where he undoubtedly saved countless lives. Armed only with a Narwhal tusk, Gallant ended Usman Khan's rampage, and heroics will see his sentence cut following an intervention by the Queen. A spokesman for the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) said: "The Lord Chancellor has granted Steven Gallant a Royal Prerogative of Mercy reducing his minimum tariff of 10 months in recognition of his exceptionally brave actions at Fishmongers' Hall, which helped save people's lives despite the tremendous risk to his own." Back in 2005, Barrie had been sprayed with CS gas and beaten to the ground with a hammer by a gang of men - including Gallant - who wanted revenge after he was cleared of the attempted murder of a 64-year-old Hull prostitute. Steve Gallant and James Gilligan, both of east Hull, were eventually convicted of murder, and ordered to spend at least 17 years behind bars.

In November 29, 2019 - the day of the London Bridge terror attack - Gallant was on his first day release from prison and he was taking part in a Learning Together event at London's Fishmongers' Hall, next to London Bridge. Khan, who was shot dead by police, had armed himself with two knives and was wearing a mock suicide bomb vest when he began attacking members of the public on London Bridge. His mission to kill as many people as possible was thwarted, however, when Gallant and several others on the course risked their own lives to restrain Khan. Speaking about Jackson's murder, Gallant said: "Nobody has the right to take another's life and I offer my sincere apologies to my victim's family for the hurt caused. The family of a firefighter murdered by London Bridge terror hero Steven Gallant have reacted to the news he is to receive a royal pardon.

Steven Gallant, 42, is set to go before a parole board in June after having 10-months taken off his 17-year jail sentence for the murder of Barrie Jackson in 2005, reports HullLive. It comes after Gallant helped to foil the terror attack on London Bridge last November armed only with a Narwhal tusk - he has seen his sentence cut following an intervention by the Queen. Gallant helped to restrain terrorist Usman Khan who had killed two Cambridge graduates during his rampage. Mr Jackson's son, Jack, 21, told the Sunday Mirror he has "mixed emotions" on the news but added Gallant's actions on London Bridge show "the reality that people can change." He said: "In my mind, Gallant has nearly done his time and if someone has undergone rehabilitation and change, which it seems he has, then it's fair enough. Gallant tackled terrorist Usman Khan moments after he had stabbed to death two organisers of a prisoner rehabilitation event in London, Jack Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23.

As he ran towards London Bridge looking for more victims, Gallant held him at bay with a narwhal tusk he had grabbed from a wall at the scene of the attacks in a nearby conference venue. A statement issued by his solicitor, Hull lawyer Neil Hudgell to the Sunday Mirror, said: "Steve feels a debt of gratitude to all those who helped him to achieve a Royal Prerogative of Mercy. Gallant, now 42, had been among a gang who battered Jack's dad Barrie to death outside The Dolphin pub in Hull in April 2005. A court heard Gallant planned the assault believing Barrie had attacked his girlfriend eight days before. After his involvement in the London Bridge incident, Gallant said through Mr Hudgell: "It is right I was handed a severe penalty for my actions.

Last night the father of Khan's victim Jack Merritt, David, 55, of Cottenham in Cambridgeshire, said he supported Gallant's pardon. He said: "Steve fully deserves this pardon, or reduction in sentence. They spokesperson said: "The Lord Chancellor has granted Steven Gallant a Royal Prerogative of Mercy reducing his minimum tariff of 10 months in recognition of his exceptionally brave actions at Fishmongers' Hall, which helped save people's lives despite the tremendous risk to his own." Under the terms of the Royal Prerogative of Mercy granted by the Queen, on the advice of her Government, he will receive a 10-month reduction in his life term, set at a minimum of 17-years when he was convicted in Hull in 2005. The convicted murderer who helped foil the terror attack on London Bridge last November armed only with a Narwhal tusk will see his sentence cut following an intervention by the Queen. Steven Gallant, 42, was on day release at the event for reformed prisoners in Fishmonger's Hall when he helped end Usman Khan's rampage, which left two Cambridge graduates dead. Jack Merrit, 25, and 23-year-old Saskia Jones – both part of the Learning Together scheme to help prisoners access education – were killed, while several others were wounded. It was Gallant's first time out on licence after being jailed for life with a minimum term of 17 years in 2005 for the murder of a firefighter in Hull. He helped restrain Khan, who was wearing a fake suicide vest and armed with two knives, before the terrorist was shot dead by police. A spokesperson for the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) said: "The Lord Chancellor has granted Steven Gallant a Royal Prerogative of Mercy reducing his minimum tariff of 10 months in recognition of his exceptionally brave actions at Fishmongers' Hall, which helped save people's lives despite the tremendous risk to his own." Terrorist Usman Khan was shot dead by police at the scene. He told the Daily Mirror: "Steve fully deserves this pardon, or reduction in sentence. He was one of two men convicted of the murder of Barrie Jackson, 33, who was beaten to death outside a pub in Hull. The previous year, Jackson had himself been cleared of the attempted murder of a 64-year-old woman – stamping on her face and dumping her unconscious in a skip. Jackson's student son Jack, 21, told the Mirror: "In my mind, Gallant has nearly done his time and if someone has undergone rehabilitation and change, which it seems he has, then it's fair enough." Convicted murderer Steven Gallant is due to have his sentence released after confronting Usman Khan during the London Bridge terror attack while on day release. Gallant, 42, was praised at the time for intercepting the 28-year-old knifeman with a narwhal tusk ripped from the wall of the Fishmongers' Hall, where the attack took place. The convicted criminal was jailed for 17 years in 2005 for the brutal murder of ex-firefighter Barrie Jackson outside a pub in Hull. On the day of the terror attack last November, Gallant was on day release and attending a prisoner rehabilitation event at the Fishmongers Hall. The event, organised by the University of Cambridge's Learning Together programme, was also attended by Jack Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23, both Cambridge graduates involved in prisoner rehabilitation who were killed in the attack. Using a chair and narwhal tusk handed to him by civil servant Darryn Frost, who also risked his life to take on the attacker, Gallant restrained Khan on London Bridge. Merritt and Jones were killed and two women and a man were injured before Khan was shot dead by armed officers on London Bridge. A Ministry of Justice spokesperson said: "The lord chancellor has granted Steven Gallant a Royal Prerogative of Mercy reducing his minimum tariff by 10 months in recognition of his exceptionally brave actions at Fishmongers' Hall, which helped save people's lives despite the tremendous risk to his own." David Merritt, Jack's father, said to The Daily Mirror: "Steve fully deserves this pardon, in reduction in sentence. In a rare decision by the Queen, the royal prerogative of mercy has been granted to the murderer. Jackson's son Jack, 21, said: "I have mixed emotions – but what happened at London Bridge goes to show the reality that people can change." Gallant was one of two men convicted for the murder of ex-firefighter Jackson, 33. During the trial at Hull Crown Court, it was heard that the attack was premeditated and Gallant wrongly believed Jackson had attacked his girlfriend eight days prior. The last murderer to receive the official royal pardon was almost 25 years ago when former IRA leader and police informer Sean O'Callaghan, who died in 2017, was freed.