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14 October 2020 22:42

London Orpington Orpington bus crash

A prime-time BBC documentary will show how ambulance services responded to last Halloween's Orpington bus crash which claimed the life of a driver. Episode 5 of BAFTA award winning 'Ambulance' begins following incident response officers Rachel and Pete, who each travelled around 12 miles to the scene after a flurry of calls from distressed passengers on two buses that were involved in a collision with a third vehicle. Despite the efforts of forty ambulance staff who responded, bus driver Kenneth Matcham, 60, tragically died from his injuries. Dorjan Cera, 20, was jailed for seven years and eight months in August after he was found guilty of causing Mr Matcham's death by dangerous driving. Nicola and Maisie, a Mum and daughter crew who work together on a double crewed ambulance, join LAS colleagues on scene to treat the injured and traumatised.

Emergency Ambulance Crew Maisie, who has been with LAS for two years and was just 20 at the time of the crash said: "A scene like that is so chaotic, it can feel overwhelming. The emergency response to a horrific crash that killed a London bus driver and injured 14 others will be shown on TV tonight. The latest episode of the BBC1 documentary Ambulance shows the response of London Ambulance Service crews and other frontline responders to the late-night incident on Halloween last year. Mother and daughter medics Nicola and Maisie Broszek were urgently diverted to the scene, as they headed to a 999 call to treat an 86-year-old woman with breathing difficulties, to join the massive response to the crash in Orpington. The other, which was hit by the car, resulted in the death at the scene of 60-year-old bus driver Kenneth Matcham.

Maisie, an emergency ambulance crew medic, who treated the surviving bus driver, was 20 at the time. Garrett Emmerson, chief executive of LAS, said: "They only thankfully happen maybe a few times a year, and to see on screen tonight the professionalism and dedication of all of our crews and people that have to respond to these incidents, day in, day out, big or small, gives the public a feel of what goes on behind the scenes and what it takes to be able to care for patients across London when they most need it." Police said that Cera, who had been on licence for drug-dealing and driving offences at the time of the crash, had been driving on the wrong side of the road when he smashed into the bus driven by grandfather-of-seven Mr Matcham, from Gravesend. BBC One's Ambulance will catch the heroic efforts of London Ambulance Service crews that raced to the scene of a serious collision involving two London buses and a car. Ambulance crews raced to the tragic road incident on Sevenoaks Road, in Orpington, South London, where one bus driver sadly died at the scene. Rachel and Pete, two London Ambulance Service (LAS) incident response officers, each have around 12 miles to travel to reach the scene in Orpington where they take control of the ambulance service's response to the incident, coordinating the many skilled clinicians to ensure each patient gets the right care as soon as possible.

Mum and daughter, Nicola and Maisie, who work together on a double crewed ambulance, join LAS colleagues on scene to treat the injured and traumatised. Garrett Emmerson, London Ambulance Service CEO, said: "It is heart-breaking to see such a scene of devastation where so many people have been injured and tragically, a London bus driver lost his life. "The expertise and professionalism of London Ambulance Service colleagues is evident for all to see, from the call handlers talking to the injured and traumatised on the phone, to the incident response officers in charge of the scene, to the paramedics providing that one to one care at the roadside. A BBC One series will tonight reveal the heroic efforts of paramedics who raced to the scene of a tragic bus crash in Orpington. Rachel and Pete, two London Ambulance Service (LAS) incident response officers, each had around 12 miles to travel to reach the scene in Orpington.

Garrett Emmerson, London Ambulance Service CEO, said: "It is heart-breaking to see such a scene of devastation where so many people have been injured and tragically, a London bus driver lost his life. "The expertise and professionalism of London Ambulance Service colleagues is evident for all to see, from the call handlers talking to the injured and traumatised on the phone, to the incident response officers in charge of the scene, to the paramedics providing that one to one care at the roadside.