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12 February 2019 03:30

Loose Women Christine Lampard ITV

the satanic verses

Strictly Come Dancing winner Stacey Dooley reveals HUGE BBC show secret

Taking to Instagram on Sunday, the star shared a picture of herself and a friend lounging in the sun, and wrote in the caption: "Booking hols, avec girls like…" Fans were quick to agree with her idea, with one writing: "After all this dancing, you deserve a holiday," while another said: "You really deserve a holiday." A third joked: "Can I come too?" The Strictly tour competition has been dominated by Dianne Buswell and Joe Sugg, who won nearly every show, minus one – which was triumphed by Stacey and Aljaz. While competitiveness drove Stacey to victory during her actual Strictly Come Dancing run last autumn, she admitted on The One Show on Monday (February 11) that she's happy to have seen runner-up Joe get the wins on the live shows. Strictly Come Dancing returns to BBC One later this year — and here's all the latest news on the cast! Stacey Dooley has just finished the live tour of Strictly Come Dancing, but told The One Show hosts Matt Baker and Alex Jones all about her experience on the TV show. Islamabad (AFP) - Thirty years after Iran called for the killing of Salman Rushdie, the British novelist remains a figure of hate for extremists across the Muslim world, and though the level of outrage has dropped, the issue of blasphemy is as incendiary as ever.

satanic verses

Strictly Come Dancing's Stacey Dooley addresses losing live tour to Joe Sugg

The fatwa has caused multiple diplomatic rows over the years —- as have other cases of blasphemy, such as the controversy over satirical Danish cartoons of the Islamic prophet printed in the right-wing Jyllands-Posten newspaper in 2005. 'I don't want to hide' says Salman Rushdie, 30 years after fatwa | Photo Credit: IANS Rushdie, who some say is the greatest writer India has produced since Tagore, spent 13 years living under a false name and constant police protection. Rushdie's friend, the British Pakistani writer Hanif Kureishi, reckons no one "would have the balls today to write 'The Satanic Verses', let alone publish it." But even Kureishi, who wrote an acclaimed novel "The Black Album" in its aftermath about young British Muslims radicalising themselves, admitted that he never saw the controversy coming when he read a proof copy. There is competitive intolerance going on--'If Muslims can get the cartoons banned in Denmark, why can't we in Pakistan or India ban this Christian or Hindu writer from saying this or that?'" Sean Gallagher, of the London-based Index on Censorship, said the world has not moved on much since the Rushdie affair. AFP — On February 14, 1989 Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini called for British writer Salman Rushdie to be killed for writing "The Satanic Verses", which the cleric said insulted Islam.

salman rushdie

Authors in Search of Some Character: Salman Rushdie Calls Charlie Hebdo Boycotters 'Pussies' pic.twitter.com/GyhBTRBpwp — Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) April 28, 2015 But Khomeini's successor, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said in 2005 he still believed Rushdie was an apostate whose killing would be authorised by Islam. Thirty years after Iran called for the killing of Salman Rushdie, the British novelist remains a figure of hate for extremists across the Muslim world, and though the level of outrage has dropped, the issue of blasphemy is as incendiary as ever. Rushdie's novel "The Satanic Verses" triggered mass protests from London to Islamabad and, analysts say, closed down the space for debate around Islam in a way that still resonates today. Iran's spiritual leader, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, issued the fatwa calling for Rushdie's murder on February 14, 1989. Ashrafi said the publication of the novel "justified" laws against blasphemy — without them, he argued, "people like Rushdie will keep hurting the religious sentiments of Muslims".

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"It was a dark moment that, thirty years later, reminds us how dangerous the interference of religion in freedom of expression (is)", he told AFP. In Pakistan, where Rushdie's books have been available on the black market for years, "Joseph Anton: A Memoir" — which recounts his time in hiding after the fatwa — is quietly but openly on sale in at least one bookstore in the capital. Salman Rushdie's novel 'The Satanic Verses' triggered mass protests from London to Islamabad and, analysts say, closed down the space for debate around Islam in a way that still resonates today. ISLAMABAD - Thirty years after Iran called for the killing of Salman Rushdie, the British novelist remains a figure of hate for extremists across the Muslim world, and though the level of outrage has dropped, the issue of blasphemy is as incendiary as ever. Rushdie's novel The Satanic Verses triggered mass protests from London to Islamabad and, analysts say, closed down the space for debate around Islam in a way that still resonates today.

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Iran's spiritual leader, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, issued the fatwa calling for Rushdie's murder on 14 February 1989. Rushdie's novel, and the fatwa which followed, were "like a dam breaking", Rehman said. Ashrafi said the publication of the novel "justified" laws against blasphemy - without them, he argued, "people like Rushdie will keep hurting the religious sentiments of Muslims". "It was a dark moment that, thirty years later, reminds us how dangerous the interference of religion in freedom of expression (is)", he told AFP. The Iranian government vowed it would not act on the fatwa in 1998, but such decrees are "not revocable", Mehdi Aboutalebi, cleric and doctor of political science at the influential conservative think-tank Imam Khomeini Educational Research Institute in Qom, told AFP.

khomeini

The fatwa has caused multiple diplomatic rows over the years - as have other cases of blasphemy, such as the controversy over satirical Danish cartoons of the Islamic prophet printed in the right-wing Jyllands-Posten newspaper in 2005. Today the furore over Rushdie interests only "the most radical ayatollahs", said Clement Therme, research fellow at the Iran International Institute for Strategic Studies. In Pakistan, where Rushdie's books have been available on the black market for years, Joseph Anton: A Memoir - which recounts his time in hiding after the fatwa - is quietly but openly on sale in at least one bookstore in the capital. Salman Rushdie's life changed forever on February 14, 1989, when Iran's spiritual leader ordered the novelist's execution after branding his novel "The Satanic Verses" blasphemous. The novelist's life changed forever on February 14, 1989, when Iran's spiritual leader ordered Rushdie's execution after branding his novel "The Satanic Verses" blasphemous.

iran revolution

Rushdie spent 13 years living under a false name and constant police protection. The dark years of riots, bomb plots and the murder of one of the book's translators and the shooting and stabbing of two others now "feels like a very long time ago," he said. Rushdie's friend, the British Pakistani writer Hanif Kureishi, reckons no one "would have the balls today to write 'The Satanic Verses', let alone publish it."

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