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20 July 2020 20:32

Marks & Spencer jobs

Marks & Spencer 'plans to cut hundreds of jobs'

The coronavirus lockdown has prompted some of the UK's most prominent companies to announce large-scale job losses. Since lockdown began on 23 March, some of the UK's largest companies have announced plans to cut a total of 60,000 jobs globally, many of which will fall in the UK. 20 July: The high street stalwart cuts management jobs in stores as well as head office roles related to property and store operations. 9 July: Boots is cutting 4,000 jobs – or 7% of its workforce – by closing 48 opticians outlets and reducing staff at its head office in Nottingham as well as some management and customer service roles in stores. 9 July: John Lewis announced that it is planning to permanently close eight of its 50 stores, including full department stores in Birmingham and Watford, with the likely loss of 1,300 jobs.

7 July: The owner of the Daily Mirror, Daily Express and Daily Star newspapers is to cut 550 jobs, 12% of its workforce, amid reduced demand for advertising in its titles. 6 July: Pret a Manger is to permanently close 30 branches and could cut at least 1,000 jobs after suffering "significant operating losses" as a result of the Covid-19 lockdown 1 July: Arcadia, Sir Philip Green's troubled fashion group – which owns Topshop, Miss Selfridge, Dorothy Perkins, Burton, Evans and Wallis – said in July 500 head office jobs out of 2,500 would go in the coming weeks. 1 July: The owner of Upper Crust and Caffè Ritazza is to axe 5,000 jobs, about half of its workforce, with cuts at its head office and across its UK operations after the pandemic stalled domestic and international travel. 1 July: The New York-listed consultancy firm is making 900 job cuts at all levels across 11,000 UK employees in the face of lower demand for its services. 30 June: The European planemaker announced plans to cut 15,000 jobs, including 1,700 in the UK, as it warned the coronavirus pandemic had triggered the "gravest crisis" in its history.

25 June: Royal Mail has announced a cost-cutting plan that will involve slashing about 2,000 jobs, or one in five of its near-10,000 management roles. 11 June: The owner of British Gas announced in June that it intends to cut 5,000 jobs - a quarter of its UK workforce - in mostly senior roles, and remove three layers of management. 11 June: The fashion brands were bought out of administration by their founder, Peter Simon, in June, in a deal which saw 35 stores close permanently and led to the loss of 545 jobs. 8 June: The oil company said in June it plans to make 10,000 people redundant worldwide, including an estimated 2,000 in the UK mostly in office roles, by the end of the year. 4 June: The car dealership chain said it plans to cut 1,500 jobs and close 12 dealerships just days after car showrooms were allowed to reopen in England.

21 May: Clarks plans to cut 900 office jobs worldwide as it grapples with the growth of online shoe shopping as well as the pandemic. 19 May: Britain's second biggest energy supplier announced in May it planned to cut 2,600 jobs and close offices after the lockdown saw more of its customer service move online. 13 May: Travel company Tui plans to cut up to 8,000 jobs worldwide in response to the coronavirus chaos engulfing the tourism industry. 30 April: The fashion brands were bought out of administration by restructuring firm Hilco in April, with all of their stores permanently closed and the loss of more than 1,800 jobs. 21 April: More than 900 jobs are to be axed with immediate effect at retro retail label Cath Kidston after the company said it was permanently closing all 60 of its UK stores.

9 April: At least 4,000 jobs will be lost at Debenhams in its head office and closed stores, following its collapse into administration in April, for the second time in a year. The retailer is set to announce redundancy plans for hundreds of employees within days as part of a major restructure, according to Sky News. It comes after a bloodbath on the high street in the face of coronavirus, with the likes of John Lewis, Boots and Debenhams announcing thousands of job cuts. Companies such as John Lewis, Boots and Debenhams have already announced hundreds of job losses as the UK economy continues to reel from the devastating effect of the coronavirus pandemic. In June SSP, the owner of Upper Crust and Caffè Ritazza, said it would axe 5,000 jobs out of its 9,000 UK workforce, after suffering heavy losses during the lockdown.

Harrods told its staff that one in seven of its 4,800 employees would be affected by job cuts arising from the "ongoing impacts" of the pandemic. The M&S cuts are the latest blow to the British High street after a wave of retailers including John Lewis and Boots announced shop closures and 1,300 and 4,000 job losses respectively. Marks and Spencer is set to axe hundreds of jobs in the latest round of cuts on the high street, according to reports. The restructuring plan could see hundreds of job losses and affect several thousand employees in coming months, Sky News reports. Earlier this month, John Lewis said it will permanently close eight of its stores, putting 1,300 jobs at risk. Boots announced thousands of job cuts earlier this month (Picture: Getty Images Europe) It was further revealed that more than 3,000 workers expressed interest in voluntary redundancy at Rolls-Royce, after the car company announced plans in May to cut 9,000 jobs across the UK.