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16 October 2019 22:48

Mary Poppins Barbara Windsor EastEnders

Julie Andrews has recalled saving the life of one of the child actors in The Sound of Music after she nearly drowned while filming. In her new memoir Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years, the star discusses filming the 1965 classic alongside seven-year-old child actress Kym Karath, now 61, who played Gretl Von Trapp. The two were filming a scene in a boat on water and, in a terrifying turn of events, the vessel rocked violently and sent them both overboard – including Kym who couldn't swim. Julie, 84, remembered: "The assistant director waded rather urgently through the water towards me and whispered, 'The little one can't swim…' "Crew members dove into the water to help save her, and mercifully we got there in time," she added. Eventually, Kym began vomiting the water she had swallowed and was ultimately saved by Heather Menzies, who played Louisa in the movie.

Andrews released a memoir, a€œHome Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years,a€ which hits shelves on Oct. 15, 2019. 29, 2015 file photo, actress Julie Andrews arrives at the Los Angeles Philharmonic 2015/2016 season opening gala at Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. more Photo: Richard Shotwell Photo: Richard Shotwell Image 1 of / 1 Caption Close Andrews reflects on her Hollywood years 1 / 1 Back to Gallery It's early June in Los Angeles and Andrews is coming to film segments for a night of guest programming on Turner Classic Movies and speak about her new book, "Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years," which hits shelves Tuesday. "God, every time you talk I think, 'She sounds just like Julie Andrews!'" Mankiewicz says to his guest. For the next few hours, The Associated Press got a front-row seat as Andrews and Mankiewicz turned the little soundstage into a cozy living room for movie lovers as they discussed three films from her career: 1967's "Thoroughly Modern Millie," 1982's "Victor/Victoria" and 1986's "That's Life!," all of which she touches on in her memoir.

Although they may not be as well-known as "Mary Poppins" or "The Sound of Music," each provides a revealing glimpse into her work at different stages of her career outside of those beloved nanny roles. In talking about George Roy Hill's adaptation of "Thoroughly Modern Millie," Andrews reflected on her friendship with co-star Mary Tyler Moore. "She called me Millie and I called her Miss Dorothy for the rest of our lives," Andrews, who just turned 84 this month, said. All of the films are special to Andrews in some way, but naturally the ones she made with Blake Edwards, her husband of 41 years, are particularly so. "We made seven pictures together," Andrews said.

On "Victor/Victoria," she said Edwards advised her to watch her old friend James Garner for inspiration, telling her "not only is he a great actor, but he's a great reactor." "Blake would love to be sitting right here," she said wistfully as Mankiewicz praised the film. The third film they discuss, "That's Life!" may be the least known of the bunch but is one that is in some ways the most personal. The dramatic comedy starring Jack Lemmon as man dreading his impending 60th birthday party and Andrews as his wife was a low-budget, non-union family affair that was filmed in her and Edwards' own home using all of their friends and nothing but a 13-page outline to guide the process. "(Blake) wrote his demons in this film," Andrews says. In "Home Work," Andrews writes frankly about her relationship with Edwards, a man she remains deeply and wholly in love with and in reverence of but who also had his struggles with prescription drugs.

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The films and her conversation with Mankiewicz will air on TCM on Oct. 29 beginning at 8 p.m. and serve as a companion to the memoir, co-written with her daughter Emma Walton Hamilton, which picks up where her first memoir "Home: A Memoir of My Early Years," left off: Her arrival in Los Angeles to film "Mary Poppins," with then-husband Tony Walton and baby Emma in tow. Aided by the diaries she kept throughout her life, some excerpts of which are included in "Home Work," Andrews gives a thoughtful account of her personal and professional highs, lows and everything in between. The book and the TCM evening concludes with "That's Life!," although of course her Hollywood years continued after 1986. "There is so much more if I do write about it, 'Victor/Victoria' on Broadway and 'Princess Diaries' and other things and getting into the book writing," Andrews said. Julie Andrews has actually remembered conserving the life of one of the kid actors in The Sound Of Music after she nearly drowned while shooting. In her brand-new narrative Home Work: of My Hollywood Years, the star discusses filming the 1965 timeless alongside seven-year-old child actress Kym Karath, now 61, who played Gretl Von Trapp. The two were shooting a scene in a boat on water and, in a frightening turn of occasions, the vessel rocked strongly and sent them both overboard– including Kym who couldn't swim. Julie, 84, remembered: "The assistant director waded rather urgently through the water towards me and whispered, 'The youngster can't swim …'." Team members dove into the water to assist in saving her, and mercifully we got there in time," she added. Ultimately, Kym started vomiting the water she had swallowed and was ultimately conserved by Heather Menzies, who played Louisa in the motion picture. Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years is out now. In a new memoir, Julie Andrews writes about her Hollywood beginnings. The book, which Andrews co-wrote with her daughter Emma Walton Hamilton, was released in the market on Tuesday. It spans from her first few days in Los Angeles with the 1964 release of Mary Poppins roughly through 1995, particularly focused on the Sound of Music production. The time frame for the narrative in the book does not include her more recent experiences in the production of "Princess Diaries," "Shrek" and "Despicable Me". However, the screen and stage icon wrote about the two notable projects that landed Andrews, now 84, her first Oscar Nomination and subsequent one after that: Mary Poppins (won her best actress in the Academy Awards in 1965) and The Sound of Music. Here are the three takeaway lessons from the actress' Home Work: Mary Poppins is an icon. Andrews wrote that his co-star was "dazzlingly inventive." His sunny personality would always make her roar in laughter, she writes. Though Andrews won her first Oscar for her role as Mary Poppins, she admits that it was challenging to act in front of the camera rather than on stage in musicals. Walt Disney and the icon that it is became the welcoming crowd for Andrews' first stint in Hollywood. In fact, she wrote that her first experience working with Walt Disney was far from a disappointment. A few days after her family decided to move to Los Angeles, they met with the man behind the iconic mouse. The Sound of Music was life-changing. When Julie Andrews was offered the role of Maria Von Trapp in The Sound of Music, she was hesitant at first because she was wary that she would be typecasted as a nanny. Andrews wrote that she will forever be grateful for the nudge she got from Arthur and Bob. She admitted that she was a nervous young woman who didn't know what to do. Julie Andrews is an award-winning actress. In her book, she recalls all the great things Hollywood has taught her. More than anything, she writes, it is the experience of learning something new that made her want to do more movies. See Now: Famous Actors Who Turned Down Iconic Movie Roles