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04 October 2019 22:47

Masked protesters streamed into Hong Kong streets Friday after the city's embattled leader invoked rarely used emergency ...

Boy in serious condition after being shot during Hong Kong protests - Sky sources

A 14-year-old boy is in a serious condition after being shot in the leg during protests in Hong Kong, according to Sky sources. He was shot as around 100,000 people took part in widespread rallies on China's National Day as the Communist Party marked its 70th anniversary - despite a Hong Kong police ban. The 14-year-old boy was shot before a ban on protesters wearing masks came into force in the territory. Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam is using emergency powers to ban protesters from wearing masks Hong Kong's chief executive Carrie Lam announced the use of emergency powers, which haven't been invoked for more than 50 years, after months of violent protests. Ms Lam said Hong Kong faced "extensive and very serious danger" but stressed it was not under a state of emergency.

The Hong Kong government has invoked a colonial-era law to ban face masks in an attempt to crack down on the months-long protest movement that's gotten increasingly tense in recent weeks. "The decision to enact an anti-mask law is not easy one, but it is a necessary decision considering the situation today," Lam said at a press conference. The law, which went into effect Saturday at midnight local time, bans protesters from wearing any sort of mask or face covering, including paint, at any public gathering, including both lawful protests and unlawful assemblies. Those who violate the ban could face up to one year in jail and a fine of HK$25,000 (about $3,200 US dollars), according to the Hong Kong Free Press. Lam denied that the face mask ban meant that Hong Kong was in a state of emergency, though she warned that "freedoms are not without limits." Protesters — in face masks, of course — continued to demonstrate after Lam enacted the ban.

Protesters vandalised and set fire to branches of various Chinese state-owned banks as they marched down Nathan Road.#hongkong #hongkongprotests #antiELAB pic.twitter.com/OG5eDntZ22 — Hong Kong Free Press (@HongKongFP) October 4, 2019 The Hong Kong protests intensified in June over a controversial extradition bill that would have allowed for people accused of crimes to be sent to face trial in mainland China, which many critics feared would allow Beijing to target dissidents and others critical of the Communist Party. The mask ban was quickly interpreted as another undemocratic move, and it once again puts the Hong Kong government in direct opposition with the protesters. But the transit system is shut down, a 14-year-old has been injured by live ammunition fired by an off-duty police officer, and protesters are in the streets, in masks, in defiance of the ban and Lam's government. Hong Kong's leader says mask ban necessary to quell violence Masked protesters streamed into Hong Kong streets Friday after the city's embattled leader invoked rarely used emergency powers to ban masks at rallies in a hardening of the government's stance after four months of anti-government demonstrations. Masked protesters streamed into Hong Kong streets Friday after the city's embattled leader invoked rarely used emergency...

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong's embattled leader insisted a new measure banning masks at rallies was not a move toward authoritarian rule or at the behest of the Chinese government, which signaled its approval shortly after she implemented the toughened response to quell four months of increasingly violent protests. International observers worried, however, that Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam's use of the Emergency Ordinance — last invoked more than 50 years ago — could lead to harsher measures that would limit free expression in the semiautonomous Chinese territory. Lam announced the measure Friday night as thousands of masked protesters crammed streets in the central business district and staged demonstrations in other areas of the city, shouting "Hong Kong people, resist!" They set fires and vandalized subway stations, prompting police to respond with tear gas. Face masks have become a hallmark of protesters in Hong Kong, even at peaceful marches, amid fears of retribution at work or of being denied access to schooling, public housing and other government-funded services. A protester who identified himself as Ernest Ho noted that Hong Kong police wear masks "and they don't show their pass and their number." The ban came after widespread violence Tuesday across Hong Kong that marred China's National Day, when a police officer shot a protester at close range, escalating the violence since protests started over a now-shelved extradition bill.