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27 August 2020 00:39

Mosquito Insect repellent Pneumonia

Product found in insect repellent could kill coronavirus, military study shows

An ingredient in a popular insect repellent may help kill Covid-19, new research suggests. Citriodiol, a component of Mosi-guard Natural, was found to reduce the amount of virus detectable in a sample, according to tests carried out in the UK. Scientists at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) tested the product in two different ways. They assessed its anti-viral capabilities when applied directly to the virus as a liquid drop, and analysed the product after applying it to synthetic skin. Mosi-guard Natural was found to show anti-viral activity when mixed, in a liquid, with a sample of the virus taken from a patient in the UK.

The study found that at a higher concentration (90 per cent), Mosi-guard Natural decreased the amount of virus present to an almost undetectable amount. The second study, Mosi-guard Natural also combatted the virus on latex synthetic skin. But the report highlights that the material was saturated with the insect repellant, and latex is unlikely to behave exactly as human skin would when treated. They added that while under the conditions tested, pre-application of Mosi-guard to a latex synthetic skin resulted in a reduction of the virus, it "did not result in complete viral inactivation on the latex synthetic skin". The scientists released their findings on Wednesday, as the foundation for other scientific bodies who are researching the virus and possible solutions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends hand washing and using hand sanitizer to kill the virus on your hands, while the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has an entire list of disinfectants approved for use against COVID. A new study has found another coronavirus killer that could already be in your household: Citriodiol, an active ingredient in many insect repellents. The study, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, was conducted by Britain's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL). Researchers found that the chemical Citriodiol had "anti-viral activity against SARS-CoV-2," if mixed with the virus in the liquid phase. Citriodiol is an active ingredient in many insect repellents, with the study specifically testing out Mosi-guard, a commonly used repellent in the United Kingdom.

The study said "mixing a virus suspension with Mosi-guard spray or selected constituent components resulted in a reduction in SARS-CoV-2" after just one minute. And unlike other essential oil based products, Citriodiol has met many nationwide standards for use in insect repellents across the globe. According to Citrefine International, Citriodiol is the "only naturally sourced active ingredient registered for use in the U.S. by the EPA, and listed by the U.S. CDC to prevent bites from mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus." So it's very possible that the U.S. will issue its own research on the use of Citriodiol against the coronavirus. After all, the Ministry of Defence noted in a public statement that the study was intended to act "as the foundation for other scientific bodies who are researching the virus and possible solutions." If you're looking for specific insect repellents you can buy that contain Citriodiol, read on. And for more ways to protect yourself from getting the coronavirus, Dr. Fauci Wants You to Avoid Doing These 9 Things Right Now. A CHEMICAL found in insect repellent kills the virus that causes Covid, a study by Britain's defence laboratory shows.

Citriodiol, derived from lemon eucalyptus, is found in Mosi-guard Natural, which costs about £7 for a 75ml bottle. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 1 Common insect repellent could kill the virus that causes Covid, a military study has shown Credit: AFP or licensors The chemical can be found in common insect repellent like Mosi-Guard But the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory said more tests were needed to pinpoint the ideal concentration. Citriodiol is found in Mosi-guard Natural, which costs around £7 for a 75ml bottle. But the scientists warn: "We have no data relating the concentration applied experimentally to the latex to that resulting from a spray and rub application of Mosi-guard on human skin." Britain's armed forces were issued with the spray earlier this year because it was already known to kill other coronaviruses. The spray is not sufficient protection on its own and is used by the military along with face masks and regular hand washing.

Defence minister Jeremy Quin said: "Dstl's latest research shows that sprays containing Citriodiol, which have been made available to MOD units engaged in the Covid response, can kill the virus. "We are sharing our preliminary findings today so others can take forward additional research to confirm and expand on our findings. Most read in UK News Breaking FACTORY OUTBREAK Coronavirus outbreak closes Norfolk chicken factory as 75 staff infected 'TIN SHED ON WHEELS' Mum posts brutally honest listing for £100 'monstrosity' of a caravan COULD BE TWO Millions to win cash by matching just two numbers in new National Lottery game Exclusive UNMASKED Mum's shame as man who 'knocked out commuter in station mask row' is revealed bowled over Tiny 1-bed flat looks looks a bit of a squeeze… but wait till you see the view PROMS ROW Eamonn & Farage clash with BLM activist who says 'people don't care' about Proms "We are pleased that this is another example of Defence sourcing innovative ways to keep people safe." Defence Secretary Ben Wallace previously said it was given to military personnel as an "additional layer of protection". A product found in insect repellent can kill the strain of coronavirus that causes COVID-19, research by Britain's defence laboratory has shown. Scientists at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) are sharing their preliminary findings so others are able to conduct further research, Sky News understands.\ Britain's armed forces were issued with an insect repellent that contains a product called Citriodiol because it was believed it might offer a new layer of protection against COVID-19, Sky News revealed in April. Citriodiol is already known to kill other types of coronavirus. Defence scientists subsequently conducted research to see whether it would provide a protective layer against COVID-19, with those results being released on Wednesday. The company that produces Citriodiol also believed it could offer protection against the novel coronavirus. The mosquito spray is not a sufficient protection on its own and is used by the military as an added layer along with face masks, hand washing and other techniques to prevent the spread of coronavirus. It is found in the insect repellent Mosi Guard and others. It is understood that only insect repellent containing Citriodiol and not containing Deet is regarded as having the potential of any kind of utility against the novel coronavirus. The armed forces already had stocks of the repellent and figured it was worth trying even without the results of this research because it has no adverse effect. A PRODUCT FOUND in insect repellent may have anti-viral properties against Covid-19, research by Britain's defence laboratory suggests. Laboratory tests of Citriodiol, which is found in Mosi-guard Natural, indicate it could reduce the amount of virus detectable in a sample. Scientists at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) adopted two experimental approaches to test the product. They assessed its anti-viral activity when applied directly to the virus as a liquid drop, and also assessed the product following its application to latex synthetic skin. One-minute liquid suspension tests indicated that Mosi-guard Natural has anti-viral activity against SARS-CoV-2 England-2 – an isolate taken from a patient in the UK and obtained from Public Health England (PHE) Colindale – if mixed with the virus in the liquid phase. The study found that at a higher concentration (90%), Mosi-guard Natural gave a significant decrease of the virus, resulting in no recoverable amount. While viral studies on latex indicated that Mosi-guard Natural had anti-viral activity against SARS-CoV-2 England-2 isolate. But the report highlights that latex synthetic skin was impregnated with Mosi-guard, and while latex is used as a representative surface, it is unlikely to behave exactly as treated human skin. The scientists wrote: "We have no data relating the concentration applied experimentally to the latex to that resulting from a spray and rub application of Mosi-guard on human skin." They added that while under the conditions tested, pre-application of Mosi-guard to a latex synthetic skin resulted in a reduction of the virus, "SARS-CoV-2 England-2 isolate was recoverable from all surfaces tested and did not result in complete viral inactivation on the latex synthetic skin". The scientists released their findings today, as the foundation for other scientific bodies who are researching the virus and possible solutions. DSTL is hopeful the results can be used as a springboard for other organisations to expand and develop the research, as well as to confirm the findings in this publication. Defence minister Jeremy Quin said: "We are sharing our preliminary findings today so others can take forward additional research to confirm and expand on our findings. In May, Defence Secretary Ben Wallace confirmed the insect repellent was being given to the Armed Forces to offer potential protection against coronavirus. He said a Citriodiol-based spray had been given to personnel in light of the Surgeon General's advice that it would "do no harm" and should be used on a precautionary basis as an "additional layer of protection" against exposure to the virus.