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25 August 2020 02:44

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Google Doodle honors British sculptor Barbara Hepworth

On August 25th, 1939, sculptor Barbara Hepworth moved to St. Ives in Cornwall, England, and to honor the 81st anniversary of that event, Google has replaced their homepage logo with a Doodle celebrating Barbara Hepworth's life and sculptures. Barbara Hepworth and her family moved to St. Ives in 1939 at the outset of World War II, but it wasn't for another ten years that she would find the Trewyn Studio that most of her works were completed in and that she would also, tragically, die in. The Doodle itself depicts Barbara Hepworth hard at work on her 1947 sculpture "Pendour," which conveniently serves as the "oo" in "Google." In fact, you can see the photo that no doubt inspired the Doodle in a gallery over at Sculpture Nature. For her works and her contributions to the advancement of art, Barbara Hepworth was named Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire, in 1965, just ten years before her death. If you're interested in learning more about the life and accomplishments of Barbara Hepworth, you can head over to Google Arts and Culture, where Google has pulled together a fantastic exhibit showing the evolution of her art style.

Today's animated Doodle celebrates the life and work of English abstract sculptor Dame Barbara Hepworth. Studies sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London. Awarded the diploma of the Royal College of Art in the summer of 1923; stays on an extra year to compete for the Prix de Rome (John Skeaping is the winner). June, exhibition at the Beaux Arts Gallery, London, shared with John Skeaping and William Morgan. October–November, joint exhibition with John Skeaping at Arthur Tooth & Sons' Galleries, London Spring, Ben Nicholson begins to live and work with Hepworth in the Mall studio.

November–December, shared exhibition with Nicholson at Arthur Tooth & Sons' Galleries, London (catalogue foreword on Hepworth by Herbert Read). Hepworth's first holed sculpture, Pierced Form, probably carved in 1932, is exhibited there with the title Abstraction (it was subsequently destroyed in the war). Invited by Herbin to become a member of the Paris-based group Abstraction-Création, with which Hepworth exhibits in 1934. April, exhibition of the group Unit One, of which both Hepworth and Nicholson are members, at the Mayor Gallery, London. October, final '7 & 5′ exhibition at Zwemmer Gallery, London.

It includes the work of Mondrian, Kandinsky, Arp, Giacometti, Miró, Calder, Moholy-Nagy, Hélion, Nicholson, Hepworth, Moore and Gabo and travels to Liverpool, Newcastle, London (Alex. Publication of Circle: International Survey of Constructive Art, edited by the architect J.L. Martin, Ben Nicholson and the sculptor Naum Gabo, and designed by Hepworth and Sadie Martin. Publication of Circle coincides with the exhibition Constructive Art at the London Gallery. September, Mondrian arrives in London: Nicholson and Hepworth help him to find a room near them in Parkhill Road, where he stays until his departure for New York in 1940. After Christmas, the Hepworth-Nicholson family moves to Dunluce, a nearby house in Carbis Bay. In these cramped conditions, and with little time to work, Hepworth draws and makes plaster sculptures at night.

Exhibits in New Movements in Art at the London Museum, March–May. Hepworth, Nicholson and their family move to a larger house, Chy-an-Kerris, Carbis Bay, in July. February–April, exhibition at Wakefield City Art Gallery, travelling to Halifax. April, exhibition of paintings at the Lefevre Gallery, London. Shows at first Open Air Exhibition of Sculpture in Battersea Park, London, May–September. September, Hepworth buys Trewyn Studio in St Ives, where she lives permanently from December 1950 until her death (it is now the Barbara Hepworth Museum, opened by her family in 1976 and since 1980 an outpost of the Tate Gallery).

Exhibition New Sculpure and Drawings by Barbara Hepworth at the Lefevre Gallery in February. Retrospective at Wakefield City Art Gallery, travelling to York and Manchester. Publication of major monograph Barbara Hepworth: Carvings and Drawings, with an introduction by Herbert Read and statements by the artist. Exhibition at the Lefevre Gallery, London, in October. Film Figures in a Landscape: Cornwall and the Sculpture of Barbara Hepworth made by Dudley Shaw Ashton for the British Film Institute, with music by Priaulx Rainier. April–June, major retrospective at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London. Exhibition organised by Martha Jackson opens at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; travels to Nebraska, San Francisco, Buffalo, Toronto, Montreal, Baltimore, Washington D.C. and, with additions, the Martha Jackson Gallery in New York, December 1956–January 1957. Major bronze sculpture Meridian commissioned for State House, London. Exhibition organised by the British Council opens at the fifth São Paulo Bienal in September: Hepworth is awarded the major prize. Visits New York for the first time in October for her exhibition at the Galerie Chalette. Barbara Hepworth: Life and Work published, with a text by J. May–June, second exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, of work made between 1952 and 1962. June, Hepworth attends the unveiling of the monumental Single Form at the United Nations Secretariat in New York, commissioned in memory of her friend Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary General of the United Nations, who had been killed in 1961. Visits Copenhagen in September for the opening of her exhibition organised by the British Council; it travels throughout Scandinavia. Exhibitions at Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, New York, and at Gimpel Fils, London. Major retrospective exhibition at the Tate Gallery, London, April–May. A.M. Hammacher's Barbara Hepworth is published by Thames and Hudson (revised edition, 1987). Honorary Freedom of the Borough of St Ives conferred on Hepworth and her friend the potter Bernard Leach, accompanied by exhibitions of their work in the town. Exhibition at Marlborough Fine Art, London, in February–March. The Complete Sculpture of Barbara Hepworth 1960–69, edited by Alan Bowness, is published. Exhibition at Marlborough Fine Art, London, in April–May, including The Family of Man. Exhibition at Marlborough Gallery, New York, in March–April. BARBARA Hepworth's life is being celebrated by today's Google Doodle. 3 Today's Google Doodle celebrates the life and work of English abstract sculptor Dame Barbara Credit: PA:Press Association Today's Google Doodle celebrates the life and work of English abstract sculptor Dame Barbara Hepworth. Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth was born on January 10th, 1903 in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England. She enrolled at the Leeds School of Art, where she sparked a friendship with fellow sculptor Henry Moore, and then attended the Royal College of Art in London. On August 25 1939, Ms Hepworth arrived a town on England's southern coast called St. Ives where she created her studio and lived for the remainder of her career. As shown in today's Google Doodle, Ms Hepworth was one of the leading practitioners of "direct carving," a technique which the sculpting process is influenced by the qualities of the raw materials. Among her many accomplishments, Ms Hepworth was awarded the Grand Prix at the 1959 São Paulo Bienal, and for her invaluable contribution to British art was named Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1965. Google said: "Thank you, Dame Barbara Hepworth, for using your art to help carve a path toward greater harmony within our society and environment." Barbara Hepworth was an English abstract sculptor who's widely considered one of the mid-20th century's most impactful sculptors. To celebrate Hepworth's art and career, Google created an animated Doodle in her honor on the anniversary of her 1939 move to St. Ives, a town on England's southern coast, where she would become a leading figure in the colony of artists who resided there. Born in Wakefield, England, on Jan. 10, 1903, Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth decided at the age of 15 that she wanted to become a sculptor. Hepworth was awarded the Grand Prix at the 1959 São Paulo Bienal, was named Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1965 for her contribution to British art. Google dedicates an animated artistic doodle to Barbara Hepworth, who is widely considered one of the mid-20th century's most impactful sculptors. Barbara Hepworth was born to a civil engineer who was working for the West Riding County Council. It was there that Barbara Hepworth met her fellow Yorkshireman, Henry Moore, who was also a renowned English artist and is best known for his semi-abstract monumental bronze sculptures which are located around the world as public works of art. Barbara Hepworth successfully won a county scholarship to attend the Royal College of Art (RCA) in London, and studied there from 1921 until she was awarded the diploma of the Royal College of Art in 1924. In 1938, Barbara Hepworth married Ben Nicholson, who was an English painter of abstract compositions, landscape and still-life following his divorce from his wife Winifred. Barbara Hepworth was awarded the Grand Prix at the 1959 São Paulo Art Biennial. Google today honours the renowned English sculptor with a beautiful doodle for using your art to help carve a path toward greater harmony within our society and environment.