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20 May 2020 08:39

Organ donation Law Organ transplantation

A new organ donation law could boost the number of transplants by hundreds each year and give hope to people waiting for life-saving operations. The majority of adults in England will now automatically be considered organ donors, following a change in legislation brought about after campaigning by a young boy who received a new heart from a nine-year-old girl who died after a car crash. Max and Keira's Law changes the organ donor system to opt-out, meaning those aged 18 and over are deemed to have given consent to donate their organs when they die, unless they explicitly state otherwise or are in an excluded group. Nine-year-old Keira Ball saved the lives of Max Johnson, also nine at the time, and three others after her father allowed doctors to use her organs for transplants after a crash in 2017. Anthony Clarkson, director of organ and tissue donation and transplantation at NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT), said: "We hope this law change will prompt all of us to consider whether or not we would want to donate our organs and encourage us all to register and share our decision with our family and friends." PA 48/50 2 April 2020 A child at Westlands Primary School paints a poster in support of the NHS in Newcastle-under-Lyme Reuters 49/50 1 April 2020 Staff wearing PPE of gloves and face masks, as a preactionary measure against Covid-19, disinfect an ambulance after it arrived with a patient at St Thomas' Hospital in north London AFP via Getty 50/50 31 March 2020 Llandudno Pier remains closed and deserted of tourists during the pandemic lockdown in Wales Getty 1/50 19 May 2020 A dog jumps into the water as families relax at a Lido in London AP 2/50 18 May 2020 A fan celebrates outside Celtic Park after Celtic were crowned champions of the Scottish Premiership.

They are preparing them to support the Welsh Ambulance Service NHS Trust in the battle against coronavirus Ministry of Defence/Reuters 45/50 5 April 2020 A police officer advises a woman to go home after spotting her enjoying the sun in Primrose Hill, London AP 46/50 4 March 2020 New Leader of the Labour Party Keir Starmer speaks on the announcement of his victory in the leadership race of the Labour Party AFP via Getty 47/50 3 April 2020 Health Secretary Matt Hancock and NHS staff stand on marks on the ground, put in place to ensure social distancing guidelines are adhered to, at the opening of the NHS Nightingale Hospital at the ExCel centre in London, a temporary hospital with 4000 beds which has been set up for the treatment of Covid-19 patients. PA 48/50 2 April 2020 A child at Westlands Primary School paints a poster in support of the NHS in Newcastle-under-Lyme Reuters 49/50 1 April 2020 Staff wearing PPE of gloves and face masks, as a preactionary measure against Covid-19, disinfect an ambulance after it arrived with a patient at St Thomas' Hospital in north London AFP via Getty 50/50 31 March 2020 Llandudno Pier remains closed and deserted of tourists during the pandemic lockdown in Wales Getty Matt Hancock, the health secretary, said: "Today we celebrate a milestone for organ donation as we move to a new system of deemed consent in England which will mean hundreds more lives could be transformed each year. The new organ donation law is aimed at boosting the number of transplants to those who need life-saving operations. It is hoped the law, which takes effect from Wednesday, will lead to an additional 700 transplants each year by 2023, and spark conversations around organ donation. Keira Ball saved four lives, including that of Max Johnson, also aged nine at the time, after her father allowed doctors to use her organs for transplants following a crash in 2017.

Anthony Clarkson, director of organ and tissue donation and transplantation at NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT), said: "We hope this law change will prompt all of us to consider whether or not we would want to donate our organs and encourage us all to register and share our decision with our family and friends." Faizan Awan is one of thousands of people across the UK who has been waiting for a transplant. He said: "For many people like me, who are waiting for an organ, the law change is a sign of hope and a transplant would dramatically change my life in a number of ways. The new legislation is known as 'Max and Keira's law' after the death of nine-year-old Keira Ball saved the life of Max Johnson, also nine, and three other people. Patients awaiting transplants have hailed a 'game-changing' new law which from today means that every adult is automatically considered an organ donor The new legislation is known as 'Max and Keira's law' after the death of nine-year-old Keira Ball, pictured with mother Loanna, saved the life of Max Johnson, also nine, and three other people