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10 July 2020 00:31

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Michael Holding breaks down in tears on live TV as he recalls racism his parents suffered

Former West Indies cricketer Michael Holding broke down in tears live on camera while discussing racism his parents faced in the past. Yesterday the ex-fast bowler made an impassioned plea for society to change on the first day of England's test match against West Indies in Southampton. In an interview with Sky News' Mark Austin today, the former cricketer, 66, revealed he was thinking about his parents when he became emotional on TV. Wednesday: Holding's incredibly moving speech about racism In full: Ex-West Indies cricketer and Sky Sports commentator discusses racism Holding paused, before continuing: "Mark, I know what my parents went through. "I know what they went through, and that came back to me immediately," Holding said, wiping tears from his eyes.

He also spoke about times he faced racism over the years, including when he and his white friend were assumed to not be booking into a hotel together in South Africa. He added he hoped tackling institutional racism would not be "brushed under the carpet" and again urged for better education on black history. He said: "I hope people understand exactly what I'm saying, and exactly where I'm coming from. "It cannot continue like this - we have to understand that people are people." Yesterday during a delay for rain Holding revealed he had attended Black Lives Matter protests, and referred to the case of Amy Cooper, who called police after arguing with a black man in New York's Central Park. He said: "She threatened this black man with her whiteness, saying that she was going to call the police and tell them there was a black man threatening her.

"If the society in which she was living did not empower her or get her to think that she had that power of being white and being able to call the police on a black man, she would not have done it. He went on to highlight the case of Lewis Howard Latimer, the black man who perfected the carbon filament that made the lightbulb possible, but is virtually unknown compared to its white inventor, Thomas Edison. Michael Holding was overcome with emotion while opening up about the racism his parents suffered during a television interview on Thursday afternoon. The West Indies legend and Sky Sports commentator was following up from a heartfelt speech he made on Wednesday during a rain delay in the Test match between the touring Windies side and England. "The environment in which you grow, the society in which you live, encourages and teaches racism.

You cannot have a society brought up like that, both black and white, only teaching what's convenient to the teacher. History is written by the people who do the harm, not by the people who get harmed. "We need to go back and teach both sides of history and until we do that and educate the entire human race, this thing will not stop." And speaking after the second day of the Test, Holding took time to compose himself as he expanded his comments from the day earlier and opened up on his own family's experience of racism. The former fast bowler told Sky News' Mark Austin: "To be honest, that emotional part came when I started thinking of my parents. "Mark, I know what my parents went through.

My mother's family stopped talking to her because her husband was too dark. But I hope, even if it's a baby step at a time, even a snail's pace, but I'm hoping it will continue in the right direction. Michael Holding is widely regarded as one of the best fast bowlers to have ever played Test cricket. He is married to Laurie-Ann Holding, who comes from Antigua. Along with her partner Rhonda Kelly, she runs an events and communications company called Kelly Holding Ltd. Discussing her feelings about cricket in an interview in 2017, Laurie-Ann said: "I don't like cricket… I love it.

Michael Holding wife: Laurie-Ann is a big cricket fan "As a West Indian I am proud of the history and many great players our many small islands have produced." Michael Holding is a former West Indies cricketer READ MORE Isa Guha: The trailblazing new face of Test cricket Laurie-Ann's husband now works as a pundit and commentator on Sky Sports and he has become a leading voice in the fight against racism. On the first day of England's test match against West Indies in Southampton, the 66-year-old made an impassioned plea for societal change, calling for more education on racial issues. Holding said: "When I say education, I mean going back in history. What people need to understand is that this thing stems from a long time ago, hundreds of years ago. People will tell you, 'that's a long time ago, get over it'. Cricket great Michael Holding has broken down when discussing the racism faced by his parents, during a live interview with Sky News UK. It comes just a day after the former fast bowler gave a passionate speech on the Black Lives Matter movement ahead of the first Test between England and West Indies. Speaking to Sky News in the UK, the 66-year-old became emotional when he revealed he'd been thinking about his parents during the segment on day one. "To be honest, that emotional part came when I started thinking of my parents. "I know what my parents went through, my mother's family stopped talking to her because her husband was too dark. "I know what they went through, and that came back to me immediately," Holding said. The cricket legend had to stop to wipe away tears. "I hope people understand exactly what I'm saying, and exactly where I'm coming from. Michael Holding wipes away tears during a live interview discussing racism. Holding, who was part of the fearsome West Indian teams of the 1970s and 1980s, said it will take time for change to be realised. "It's going to be a slow process, but I hope, even if it's a baby step at a time, even snail's pace, I'm hoping it will continue in the right direction." Yesterday Holding was overcome with emotion as he called for institutional racism to be ended through further education to future generations, in a powerful message that quickly spread around the world. Holding used the example of Amy Cooper, the woman who called police and falsely accused an African American man of threatening her life in New York's Central Park to drive home his point. Cricket commentator Michael Holding broke down in tears discussing the effects of racism during the first Test between England and the West Indies. Cricket commentator Michael Holding has broken down in tears during a live TV cross a day after his powerful anti-racism message went viral. The former fast bowler and ex-England star Ebony Rainford-Brent captivated the cricket world before play on day one of the first Test between the West Indies and England as they shared their experiences of racism and urged people to embrace the Black Lives Matter movement. Holding was on the verge of tears on day one, and on day two became overwhelmed with emotion. Watch every ball of the West Indies Tour of England Live & On-Demand on Kayo. "To be honest, that emotional part came when I started thinking of my parents, and it's coming again now," Holding said in a cross with Sky News in the UK. "I know what my parents went through," he added before pausing to compose himself. "My mother's family stopped talking to her because her husband was too dark. I know what they went through, and that came back to me immediately. "It (change) is going to be a slow process but even if it's a baby step at a time, even a snail's pace, but I'm hoping it will continue in the right direction. Holding and Rainford-Brent stopped the cricket world in its tracks on Wednesday night (AEDT) as they delivered a raw message about racism. "What people need to understand, this stems from a long time ago, hundreds of years ago, the dehumanisation of the black race is where it started," Holding said. "People will tell you, 'That's a long time ago, get over it'. "We need to go back and teach both sides of history and until we do that and educate the entire human race, this thing will not stop." Heading into day three, the West Indies were 1/57 in response to England's first innings total of 204.