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11 February 2020 20:32

Rebecca Black Friday Rebecca Black

Monday marked the nine-year anniversary of the much-maligned music video for the pop song Friday, in which a then-13-year-old Rebecca Black crooned with auto-tune that it's 'Friday, Friday, gotta get down on Friday.' The song and cheesy music video made Rebecca, a young teen from Irvine, California, an instant YouTube celebrity — and international laughingstock, making her the target of vicious online bullying and real-life ostracism. Nearly a decade later, Rebecca, now 22, had shared a message for her younger self — who, she said, was 'terribly ashamed,' depressed, and tormented at school. Monday marked the nine-year anniversary of the much-maligned music video for the pop song Friday starring a then-13-year-old Rebecca Black Looking back: Nearly a decade later, Rebecca, now 22, had shared a message for her younger self, while sharing an image of herself now versus how she looked in the music video Rebecca is now all grown up, and has some perspective to speak about what she faced as a 13-year-old. 'Nine years ago today, a music video for a song called "Friday" was uploaded to the internet,' she wrote on Instagram on February 10. 'Above all things, I just wish I could go back and talk to my 13-year-old self, who was terribly ashamed of herself and afraid of the world,' she went on.

'To my 15-year-old self, who felt like she had nobody to talk to about the depression she faced. 'To my 17-year-old self, who would get to school only to get food thrown at her and her friends. 'To my 19-year-old, self who had almost every producer/songwriter tell me they'd never work with me. She said: 'I'm trying to remind myself more and more that every day is a new opportunity to shift your reality and lift your spirit. Sad: She admitted that her 13-year-old self (pictured in 2011) 'was terribly ashamed of herself and afraid of the world' 'Hell, to myself a few days ago, who felt disgusting when she looked in the mirror!

'I'm trying to remind myself more and more that every day is a new opportunity to shift your reality and lift your spirit. Rebecca faced years of torment for a fun thing she did with friends as a kid. She was in middle school when she learned about ARK Music Factory, a music label that customers could pay to write them a song, record it, and put together a corresponding music video. The company was frequently hired by the wealthy parents of kids and teens in the Los Angeles area to create these sort of novelty music videos. Not fair: At 15, Rebecca (pictured in the music video) 'felt like she had nobody to talk to about the depression she faced' Rough: Even at 17, she 'would get to school only to get food thrown at her and her friends' But just a month after it was uploaded to YouTube in February 2011, it went viral, and viewers around the world mocked Rebecca.

It got worse: Rebecca received death threats from strangers online, and had to drop out of high school and be homeschooled because things got so bad. 'It wasn't really the kind of attention any 13-year-old girl wants,' she told Entertainment Weekly in 2014. Growing: She's still working on it, and said that even a few days ago, she 'felt disgusting when she looked in the mirror' Success: Rebecca continues to make music and has a million and a half YouTube subscribers 'It wasn't really the kind of attention any 13-year-old girl wants,' she said of the traumatic experience, which forced her to drop out of school 'In my life, there were people I personally knew at school and in my inner circle who verbally abused me. But then there were also complete strangers from all around the world using social media to deride me, degrade me and even worse; some people threatened my life,' she went on. 'I once met someone who had bullied me online, and she told me to my face that she hadn't ever considered that I was actually a real, living, breathing human being,' she recalled. 'People still say hateful things about me, but it happens less often these days. Rebecca hasn't given up on music. She continued to sing throughout her teens, recording original songs and sharing covers on YouTube, where she has 1.46 million subscribers. Most recently, she released singles called Sweetheart, Anyway, and Do You. On Feb. 10, 2011, Rebecca Black became a viral sensation with her video singing "Friday." However, "Friday" was not a success story. People mocked Black, who was only 13 years old at the time she recorded it. "Friday" still makes lists of worst musicians and worst songs. Rebecca Black | | Jennifer Graylock/Getty Images for Kohls She posted a message about the anniversary of her infamous "Friday" video on her social media accounts. She revealed how difficult it was for her growing up after the notoriety and negativity "Friday" generated, but concluded with an empowering message for anyone going through rough times, or just growing up. The reaction to her post might have finally turned things around for Black. Rebecca Black's Black 'Friday' ARK Music Factory posted Black's video in 2011. By the time Black forced ARK to remove it in a legal dispute, 166 million people had viewed it. Stephen Colbert once performed a rendition on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. Rebecca Black through the years In her post, Black described how the negative reaction to "Friday" impacted her life every two years. "9 years ago today, a music video for a song called 'Friday' was uploaded to the internet. Above all things, I just wish I could go back and talk to my 13-year-old self who was terribly ashamed of herself and afraid of the world. To my 15-year-old self who felt like she had nobody to talk to about the depression she faced, to my 17-year-old self who would get to school only to get food thrown at her and her friends, to my 19-year-old self who had almost every producer/songwriter tell me they'd never work with me. Hell, to myself a few days ago who felt disgusting when she looked in the mirror!" Rebecca Black social media post 2/10/2020 Rebecca Black | Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images "I'm trying to remind myself more and more that every day is a new opportunity to shift your reality and lift your spirit," Black wrote. Time heals and nothing is finite. After Black's anniversary post, supportive fans tweeted to let her know she wasn't alone. This user wrote, "Probably a good time to reflect on how growing up on the Internet literally scarred people. "Will willingly admit I was one of the mean online bullies when the song came out," Benjamin David wrote. Nobody deserves to be bullied that badly at that age for something as silly as 'Friday.' You go Rebecca Black." Black responded, "Okay so I just got back on Twitter and I am just so blown away and confused and grateful at the messages you guys have been sending to me in response to this. Thank you a million times. Rebecca Black has offered advice to her younger self as she marked nine years since the release of her viral hit Friday. The singer was 13 when she was thrust into the limelight as the music video, which saW her driving around in a car with her friends, took the internet by storm. Posting a photo of herself now and a picture of herself back then, she said: "9 years ago today a music video for a song called "friday" was uploaded to the internet. "above all things, i just wish i could go back and talk to my 13 year old self who was terribly ashamed of herself and afraid of the world. "to my 15 year old self who felt like she had nobody to talk to about the depression she faced. "to my 17 year old self who would get to school only to get food thrown at her and her friends. "to my 19 year old self who had almost every producer/songwriter tell me they'd never work with me. Rebecca Black in 2017 (PA) "hell, to myself a few days ago who felt disgusting when she looked in the mirror! "i'm trying to remind myself more and more that every day is a new opportunity to shift your reality and lift your spirit. it's a process that's never too late to begin. this might be a weird thing to post but the honesty feels good if nothing else." Black has been open about the bullying and trolling she received after Friday came out.