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03 December 2019 18:50

Scotland Beaver Royal Zoological Society of Scotland

Lebanese artist shortlisted for prestigious Turner Prize 2019

Image copyright Press handout Image caption Clockwise from top left: Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Helen Cammock, Oscar Murillo and Tai Shani The four artists competing for this year's Turner Prize have been announced with investigative art, works blurring fact and fiction and explorations of oppression dominating the shortlist. The nominees are Jordanian Lawrence Abu Hamdan, London-based Helen Cammock and Tai Shani and Colombian Oscar Murillo. Image copyright Lawrence Abu Hamdan Beirut-based Lawrence Abu Hamdan is an artist more interested in the ear than the eye. He thinks of himself as an "audio investigator" who makes films, installations, and gives performative lectures based on earwitness (not eyewitness) accounts from oppressed individuals, or, in another project, from racially-profiled individuals who are being judged on the basis of how they pronounce certain words or syllables. Fellow London-based artist Tai Shani shares Cammock's interest in the written word and associated assumptions, depending on the gender and perceived status of the author.

Oscar Murillo is a Colombian-British artist and the most established name on the shortlist. An artist who conducted interviews for an installation with former detainees of a notorious jail in Syria has been shortlisted for this year's Turner Prize. Lawrence Abu Hamdan, 34, used survivor testimonies from Saydnaya, a high-security prison which has been described as an "architectural instrument of torture", to create a sound installation. The shortlist for the contemporary art prize also features Helen Cammock, 48, who lives in London and whose film explores the history and role of women in the civil rights movement in Londonderry in 1968. The work of Colombian-born Oscar Murillo, 33, included installing industrial ovens to make "sculptures made of corn mixed with clay, resembling rocks or bread, in a work addressing consumption, labour and basic human sustenance.

Three Londoners have been shortlisted for contemporary art's biggest prize. The four contenders for this year's Turner Prize, worth £40,000 to the winner, include Colombian-born Oscar Murillo who moved to the capital with his family aged 11 and whose entry includes a recording of his father recounting his early years as an immigrant in London. Also nominated is former Royal College of Art student Helen Cammock who was praised for her film The Long Note which examines the role of women in the civil rights movement in Northern Ireland and fellow Londoner Tai Shani whose exhibition Dark Continent is inspired by the idea of a city filled with women. Image: The New Life, 2018, installation view at the Secession, Vienna Anthea Hamilton and Thomas Dane Gallery 17/17 Posy Simmonds: A Retrospective May 24 - September 15, House of Illustration; houseofillustration.org.uk Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images 1/17 Don McCullin Image: The New Life, 2018, installation view at the Secession, Vienna Anthea Hamilton and Thomas Dane Gallery 17/17 Posy Simmonds: A Retrospective May 24 - September 15, House of Illustration; houseofillustration.org.uk Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images The shortlist is completed by Beirut-based artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan whose recent shows were inspired by interviews he did with former prisoners of the Syrian regime. All four will exhibit their shortlisted work at Margate's Turner Contemporary gallery in a show from September 28 with the overall winner being declared on December 3.

The artists shortlisted for the coveted Turner Prize 2019, whose work will be exhibited in Kent later this year, have been announced. The internationally famous prize is one of the most prestigious in the art world and this autumn, the four artists whose work has been shortlisted, will exhibit at Turner Contemporary in Margate. The shortlist was announced this morning at a press conference held at Tate Britain in London. Turner Contemporary in Margate will host the Turner Prize shortlist The artists shortlisted are: Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Helen Cammock, Oscar Murillo and Tai Shani. Lawrence Abu Hamdan's work investigates crimes that have been heard and not seen; exploring the processes of reconstruction, the complexity of memory and language as well as the urgency of human rights and advocacy.

He was shortlisted for his solo exhibition Earwitness Theatre at Chisenhale, video installation Walled Unwalled and performance After SFX at Tate Modern. Helen Cammock is shortlisted for her solo exhibition The Long Note at Void, Derry~Londonderry and IMMA, Dublin. The jury praised the timely and urgent quality of her work which explores social histories through film, photography, print, text and performance. The Long Note looks at the history and the role of women in the civil rights movement in Derry Londonderry. Oscar Murillo, Turner Prize shortlist Picture: Joo Yongsung Tai Shani was shortlisted for her participation in Glasgow International 2018, solo exhibition DC: Semiramis at The Tetley, Leeds and participation in Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance at Nottingham Contemporary and the De Le Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea. Tai Shani, Turner Prize shortlsted artist The jury noted the compelling nature of her ongoing project Dark Continent, developed over four years, which takes inspiration from a 15th century feminist text, Christine de Pizan's The Book of the City of Ladies.

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Among those attending was Victoria Pomery, director of Turner Contemporary, which will host the Turner Prize exhibition from Saturday, September 28 to Sunday, January 12, 2020. Every other year, the prize leaves Tate Britain and is presented at a venue outside London and the Margate gallery has been chosen this year. The prize and the Margate gallery, which has been open eight years, are both named after English painter JMW Turner - who was said to be both controversial and innovative for his time during the 18th and 19th centuries. The prize winner will be announced at an awards ceremony on Tuesday, December 3. Vermilion Towers by artist JMW Turner who the gallery and prize are named after Lebanese artist shortlisted for prestigious Turner Prize 2019 DUBAI: The artists shortlisted for the coveted Turner Prize 2019 were announced on Wednesday morning, with Lebanese artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan scoring a nod. The press conference was held at the Tate Britain in London, with the prize set to be announced on Dec. 3. Read our interview with Lawrence Abu Hamdan, about his work at Art Dubai 2018, here. This year's shortlisted artists, who were announced today at Tate Britain, include Abu Hamdan, Helen Cammock, Oscar Murillo and Tai Shani. Abu Hamdan was shortlisted for his solo exhibition "Earwitness Theatre" and for the video installation "Walled Unwalled: and performance After SFX at Tate Modern, London. Abu Hamdan's work investigates crimes that have been heard and not seen; exploring the processes of reconstruction, the complexity of memory and language as well as the urgency of human rights and advocacy. Cammock's work explores social histories through film, photography, print, text and performance. His work incorporates a variety of techniques and media including painting, drawing, performance, sculpture and sound, often using recycled materials and fragments from his studio, according to the Turner Prize website.