loading...

25 August 2020 14:38

Sinn Féin Mary Lou McDonald Brexit and the Irish border

appledore

Unemployment rose to 4.2pc in June. Asian shares were mostly higher on Tuesday as investors hung onto hopes the coronavirus pandemic may come under control as treatments get developed. "The positive coverage on potential Covid-19 vaccines and treatments opens the door wide open to a rotating carousel of stocks," said Stephen Innes, chief global markets strategist at AxiCorp. Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 index rose 1.7pc to 23,378.47. Get the pick of the week's stories and fascinating Devon history features direct to your inbox every Saturday morning in our exclusive Weekend Report newsletter Sign me up!

appledore

Boris Johnson has addressed rumours that he would 'resign' due to ill health after his COVID-19 coronavirus battle. The Prime Minister was asked about the rumours, which reportedly began circulating earlier today from a top Government aid, while visiting Appledore Shipyard in North Devon. When asked about the rumours by Devon Live reporter Joel Cooper, Mr Johnson he responded: "It's absolute nonsense! I am feeling, if anything, far better as I've lost some weight. "I feel much much better for having lost, by my standards, quite a lot of weight." During his visit to the historic shipyard, which is set reopen after a £7m sale was agreed, Mr Johnson was also quizzed about rules on face masks for children returning to school - and the A-Level and GCSE results debacle.

appledore

Mr Johnson also called for an end to "cringing embarrassment about our history" after the BBC decided to strip lyrics from traditional Last Night of the Proms favourites such as Land Of Hope And Glory. The broadcaster revealed details of its schedule for the Last Night event after reports that anthems Rule Britannia! and Land Of Hope And Glory could face the axe over their perceived association with colonialism and slavery. On Monday night, the BBC issued a statement saying the two songs would be performed by the orchestra, but without singing during the September 12 concert. Mr Johnson shared his reaction during his visit to Devon, telling reporters: "I was gonna tweet about this, but I just want to say… if it is correct, which I cannot believe that it really is, but if it is correct, that the BBC is saying that they will not sing the words of Land Of Hope And Glory or Rule Britannia!

appledore

as they traditionally do at the end of The Last Night of The Proms. "I think it's time we stopped our cringing embarrassment about our history, about our traditions, and about our culture, and we stopped this general fight of self-recrimination and wetness. The BBC said there had been "unjustified personal attacks" on social media on Finnish conductor Dalia Stasevska, who will be at the helm of the Last Night this year. "Decisions about the Proms are made by the BBC, in consultation with all artists involved," it said. The national anthem will still be sung during the event, which will air on BBC Radio 3 and on BBC One and feature soprano Golda Schultz and the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

The BBC said: "The Proms will reinvent the Last Night in this extraordinary year so that it respects the traditions and spirit of the event whilst adapting to very different circumstances at this moment in time. "With much reduced musical forces and no live audience, the Proms will curate a concert that includes familiar, patriotic elements such as Jerusalem and the national anthem, and bring in new moments capturing the mood of this unique time, including You'll Never Walk Alone, presenting a poignant and inclusive event for 2020. "The programme will include a new arrangement by Errollyn Wallen of Hubert Parry's Jerusalem alongside new orchestral versions of Pomp And Circumstance March No 1 Land Of Hope And Glory' (arr Anne Dudley) and Rule Britannia! Earlier, a Number 10 spokesman said Mr Johnson believes in tackling the "substance" not the "symbols" of problems, after the Sunday Times reported that the songs could face the axe. "This is a decision and a matter for the organisers of the Proms and the BBC," the spokesman said. "But the PM previously has set out his position on like issues and has been clear that, while he understands the strong emotions involved in these discussions, we need to tackle the substance of problems, not the symbols." and Land of Hope and Glory are highlights of the Last Night of the Proms. "(I) Share concerns of many about their potential removal and have raised this with (the) BBC. Business secretary Alok Sharma suggested the BBC use subtitles so viewers can sing along at home. He told Times Radio: "We've heard the BBC's position that they will maintain the traditions. Personally, I would like to see the lyrics sung and of course it is always possible to put lyrics up as subtitles on the screen so if people want to they can join in at home." The former chairman of the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, Trevor Phillips, told the station that the BBC panicked when it came to issues of race. "The principle reason it has no confidence… is that there is no ethnic diversity at the top of its decision-making tree," he said. But TV choirmaster Gareth Malone suggested Rule Britannia! was outdated, tweeting: It's time for Rule Britannia! Rule Britannia! Land Of Hope And Glory features the music of Edward Elgar and the lyrics of Arthur Benson and has lyrics such as "Thine Empire shall be strong" and "God, who made thee mighty, make thee mightier yet." The latest updates on the Prime Minister's visit in Devon can be found here Prime Minister Boris Johnson walks in the dry dock with caretaker Clifford Edwards during his visit to Appledore Shipyard, which was bought by InfraStrata, the firm which also owns Belfast's Harland & Wolff (H&W), in a £7 million deal. Picture: Ben Birchall/PA Wire Prime Minister Boris Johnson walks in the dry dock with caretaker Clifford Edwards during his visit to Appledore Shipyard, which was bought by InfraStrata, the firm which also owns Belfast's Harland & Wolff (H&W), in a £7 million deal. Boris Johnson visited the shipyard on Tuesday (August 25) after it was announced the yard had been acquired by Harland and Wolff owner Infrastrata for £7million. The deal will see the shipyard, which was closed by Babcock in March 2019, renamed H&W Appledore. The Prime Minister welcomed news of the yard's acquisition, calling it an 'exciting new chapter' for the village. "This exciting new chapter for Appledore will create hundreds of new jobs in the South West and beyond, and will drive forward our ambitions to become a shipbuilding superpower," he said. Prime Minister Boris Johnson chats with students from Petroc college during his visit to Appledore Shipyard. Picture: Ben Birchall/PA Wire Prime Minister Boris Johnson chats with students from Petroc college during his visit to Appledore Shipyard. "This kind of investment in UK skills and expertise is more important than ever as we build back better, and it's essential that we back British businesses to fulfil their potential both at home and overseas. "From apprentices just starting out, to entrepreneurs and sector leaders representing our world-class industries on the global stage, our focus is on making sure that everyone has equal access to the opportunities and support they need to succeed so that we can truly level up and unite our country." Prime Minister Boris Johnson walks across the huge dry dock with CEO InfraStrata John Wood, left, and caretaker Clifford Edwards, right, during his visit to Appledore Shipyard. Picture: Ben Birchall/PA Wire Prime Minister Boris Johnson walks across the huge dry dock with CEO InfraStrata John Wood, left, and caretaker Clifford Edwards, right, during his visit to Appledore Shipyard. Prime Minister Boris Johnson during his visit to Appledore Shipyard. Picture: Ben Birchall/PA Wire Prime Minister Boris Johnson during his visit to Appledore Shipyard. UK-based InfraStrata announced it has acquired the Appledore Shipyard located in Bideford, North Devon. The new deal follows InfraStrata's acquisition of the Harland & Wolff Shipyard in Belfast last year. "We see Appledore playing a key role in an exciting new era for UK shipyards and shipbuilding; supporting UK industry and revitalizing economic growth in the South West," said InfraStrata CEO John Wood. "Our vision is to transform it into a thriving center of excellence that creates jobs, trains apprentices and re-establishes this country at the forefront of a new generation of shipyards," he added. The shipyard, which will be known as Harland & Wolff (Appledore), is targeting five distinct sectors; defense, commercial, renewables, cruise & ferry and oil & gas. Globally, there is an estimated £6 billion pipeline of opportunities over the next five years," Wood said. "There is also a large program of sovereign new build smaller vessels planned over the next decade, ideally suited for Appledore, with its prime location and covered drydock and building hall. "Brexit will provide increased opportunities and additional demand for home-based industries; as part of the Government's leveling up agenda by investing in UK-wide regions along with the implementation of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, we see a large demand for home-built vessels post 2020. "This is a once in a lifetime chance to re-build, modernize and re-shape the industry with a new generation of shipyards, which can adapt, move quickly and utilize the expertise of a skilled and highly motivated workforce," he added. As part of its new remit, the shipyard will provide complete lifecycle management from technical services, fabrication and construction, to in-service support, repair and maintenance, and conversion all the way to decommissioning. Jointly the InfraStrata group has the potential of employing 1,550 people - 800 at Harland and Wolff (Belfast), 350 at Harland and Wolff (Appledore), and 400 during the construction phase of the Islandmagee gas storage project.