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15 May 2020 06:36

Smoking Research London

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Coronavirus: Urgent research needed into whether mouthwash could fight virus, scientists say

Transport for London (TfL) has reportedly been granted £1.6 billion, or approximately $1.9 billion in U.S. currency, in emergency funding as part of a government bailout plan Thursday, which would keep the Tube and bus system up and running through September. Speaking from Downing Street on Thursday, Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps said he wanted to avoid "a situation where people outside of the capital are unfairly carrying the burden, by which I mean, sadly, fares do end [up] having to rise with inflation." A group of scientists in the U.K. are calling for more research into the possibility that mouthwash could be used to reduce the spread of the coronavirus. However, the World Health Organization already there is no evidence mouthwash could protect someone from contracting the virus, which causes the respiratory disease COVID-19. Cardiff University researchers published a new paper in the journal Function this week, exploring the effect mouthwash may have on the virus. They note the coronavirus is surrounded by a fatty membrane, and the membranes of similar pathogens had been disrupted by ingredients found in mouthwashes, notes Yahoo News.

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The scientists noted that gargling mouthwash could cause the virus to go inactive in the throat, stopping its spread through coughs and sneezes. "Safe use of mouthwash – as in gargling – has so far not been considered by public health bodies in the U.K.," Professor Valerie O'Donnell, the lead author, wrote. "In test tube experiments and limited clinical studies, some mouthwashes contain enough of known virucidal ingredients to effectively target lipids in similar viruses. What we don't know yet is whether existing mouthwashes are active against the lipid membrane of [the coronavirus]." O'Donnell argued that "research is needed as a matter of urgency" to learn if mouthwash could be used to fight the virus. Back in February, the World Health Organization noted there is "no evidence" that using mouthwash will protect you from the coronavirus.

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"However, this does not mean they protect you from 2019-nCoV infection." Johnson & Johnson, the maker of Listerine, also has a disclaimer on its website, noting that the product "has not been tested against the coronavirus and is not intended to prevent or treat COVID-19." The World Health Organisation has said there is "no evidence" gargling mouthwash could protect you against coronavirus - despite claims from experts. A report suggested the liquid could damage the bug's protective membrane and potentially destroy Covid-19 before it infects human cells. However WHO said: "There is no evidence that using mouthwash will protect you from infection with the new coronavirus." Researchers claim more studies need to be carried out into whether mouthwash may be able to destroy the "envelope" of the virus which stops it from replicating in the mouth and throat. Experts have not claimed that commercially-available mouthwashes can prevent coronavirus, instead encouraged a study into the chemicals used. Lead author Professor O'Donnell, co-director of Cardiff University's Systems Immunity Research Institute said: "In test tube experiments and limited clinical studies, some mouthwashes contain enough of known virucidal ingredients to effectively target lipids in similar enveloped viruses.

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"What we don't know yet is whether existing mouthwashes are active against the lipid membrane of SARS-CoV-2. "Our review of the literature suggests that research is needed as a matter of urgency to determine its potential for use against this new virus." Urgent research must be done into whether mouthwash could be effective in reducing the spread of coronavirus, scientists have said. The "readily available" oral hygiene product may be able to damage the virus membrane and reduce infection rates, according to a peer-reviewed study led by Cardiff University. The study, published on Thursday in Function, a science journal, points to research that demonstrates the importance of the throat and saliva glands in the replication and transmission of the coronavirus. Sars-Cov-2, which causes Covid-19, is an enveloped virus with a fatty, or lipid, membrane.

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The study's authors said there has so far been "no discussion" about whether damaging this membrane could play a role in stopping the virus in the throat. Professor Valerie O'Donnell, lead author of the study, said: "Safe use of mouthwash – as in gargling – has so far not been considered by public health bodies in the UK. Professor O'Donnell added: "Mouthwash has not been tested against this new coronavirus yet. Log in to update your newsletter preferences Register with your social account or click here to log in I would like to receive morning headlines Monday - Friday plus breaking news alerts by email Update newsletter preferences Please log in Register with your social account or click here to log in I would like to receive lunchtime headlines Monday - Friday plus breaking news alerts, by email Update newsletter preferences Scientists have called for urgent research to be conducted into whether mouthwash could be effective in reducing the transmission of coronavirus. The call came after academics led by a team at Cardiff University conducted a review of the scientific research in the area to assess whether oral rinses could have the potential to curtail coronavirus in the early stages of an infection.

They said previous studies have shown that agents commonly found in mouthwashes – such as low amounts of ethanol, povidone-iodine and cetylpyridinium – could disrupt the lipid membranes of several enveloped viruses. SARS-CoV-2 - the virus behind the Covid-19 crisis - is an enveloped virus with an outer fatty (lipid) membrane. According to the World Health Organization, there is no evidence to suggest gargling mouthwash helps protect against the coronavirus in any way. The researchers from Cardiff University's School of Medicine, along with academics at the universities of Nottingham, Colorado, Ottawa, Barcelona and Cambridge's Babraham Institute, stressed it remains unknown whether readily available mouthwash can prevent the coronavirus from taking root. However, they added there has so far been no discussion about the potential role of damaging this membrane as a possible way to inactivate the coronavirus in the throat, and called for further research into the issue. The team assessed existing mouthwash formulations for their potential ability to disrupt the SARS-CoV-2 lipid envelope - and suggested that several deserve clinical evaluation. Publishing their findings in the Function journal, the authors of the Cardiff University-led international peer-reviewed study wrote: "We highlight that already published research on other enveloped viruses, including coronaviruses, directly supports the idea that further research is needed on whether oral rinsing could be considered as a potential way to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2." They said research to determine the potential of this approach could include evaluating existing – or specifically tailored – formulations of mouthwash in the lab and then in clinical trials. Lead author Professor Valerie O'Donnell, co-director of Cardiff University's Systems Immunity Research Institute, said: "Safe use of mouthwash – as in gargling – has so far not been considered by public health bodies in the UK. "In test tube experiments and limited clinical studies, some mouthwashes contain enough of known virucidal ingredients to effectively target lipids in similar enveloped viruses. "What we don't know yet is whether existing mouthwashes are active against the lipid membrane of SARS-CoV-2. "Our review of the literature suggests that research is needed as a matter of urgency to determine its potential for use against this new virus.

Comments

Danny Pope-Ford May 15 2020 08:22
Well, I thought the way the banks got rescued was a travesty. I thought that they should have been bailed out and not made to pay. I thought we should have done a little bit more. I think that the money should go to a lot of people who are unemployed and who are hurting. I don't think that we should have let the banks get bailed out
caroline35 May 15 2020 08:23
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Rosemary John May 15 2020 08:27
NEXT ARTICLE: Voting is the secret to winning elections. [Image credit: AP Photo/Olivier Douliery] Dear Reader, As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall
Dr. Stanley Bull May 15 2020 08:32
MORRISSEY: Well, you know, the money that has been sent to Greece is a bit of a joke. You know, the banks are like a cancer on the economy. I mean, they're just frozen up. But what is really going on is the Greek people are being punished for their politics. And that's why the Greek people are going to vote yes
Tracey Hughes May 15 2020 08:41
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