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04 January 2020 06:45

Smoking Research Simon Armitage

frances arnold

Nobel Prize-winning scientist retracts paper, saying results were not 'reproducible'

Frances Arnold, an American scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry, retracted a paper published last year after admitting to faulty research. Arnold's paper on enzymatic synthesis of beta-lactams was published in May 2019 in the Science journal. The award-winning scientist said in a series of tweets Thursday that the work had not been "reproducible" and that she had been "very busy" when the paper was submitted. I was a bit busy when this was submitted, and did not do my job well," Arnold said in a follow-up tweet. In a notice published to its website, the Science journal outlined why it was retracting the paper Arnold co-wrote with Inha Cho and Zhi-Jun Jia.

california institute of technology

"After publication of the Report "Site-selective enzymatic C‒H amidation for synthesis of diverse lactams" (1), efforts to reproduce the work showed that the enzymes do not catalyze the reactions with the activities and selectivities claimed," the statement read. "Careful examination of the first author's lab notebook then revealed missing contemporaneous entries and raw data for key experiments. "Seeing a Nobel laureate tweet about a paper retraction teaches how important it is for scientist to be honest about their data," tweeted scientist Anmol Kilkarni. Arnold works as a chemical engineer at the California Institute of Technology and won the Nobel Prize in chemistry with two other scientists for their work on the evolution of enzymes. TORONTO--A Nobel Prize winner has admitted she "did not do her job well" after a scientific paper published last year was retracted.

frances arnold

American Frances Arnold won the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 2018 "for the directed evolution of enzymes." In a series of tweets on January 2, she revealed a different paper, published May 2019, has been pulled from the highly-respected "Science" magazine. "For my first work-related tweet of 2020, I am totally bummed to announce that we have retracted last year's paper on enzymatic synthesis of beta-lactams," Arnold tweeted. For my first work-related tweet of 2020, I am totally bummed to announce that we have retracted last year's paper on enzymatic synthesis of beta-lactams. The paper, titled "Site-selective enzymatic C‒H amidation for synthesis of diverse lactams," was published with co-authors Zhi-Jun Jia and Inha Cho. A notice in the journal said efforts to try and reproduce the work of Arnold, Jia and Cho had failed, essentially proving it wrong. "Efforts to reproduce the work showed that the enzymes do not catalyze the reactions with the activities and selectivities claimed," the note read.

frances arnold

"Careful examination of the first author's lab notebook then revealed missing contemporaneous entries and raw data for key experiments. But other scientists were quick to commend Arnold, who works at the California Institute of Technology and sits on the board of directors at Google parent company Alphabet, for admitting her mistake. "Seeing a Nobel laureate tweet about a paper retraction teaches how important it is for scientist to be honest about their data," he tweeted. A Nobel Prize-winning scientist has retracted a paper she published last year and admitted the research was carried out badly. Dr Frances Arnold won the prestigious $1million (£760,000) 2018 Chemistry prize along with two other scientists for their work revealing the evolution of enzymes.

frances arnold

A separate paper which she published last year suggested enzymes found in E.coli bacteria could be forced to evolve in a way which gave them extreme precision in controlling where chemical reactions happen. But Dr Arnold, who works at the California Institute of Technology, has now retracted this paper after it was revealed to be incorrect. She said on Twitter that she had been 'very busy' when the paper was published and had not done her job well. Other academics praised Dr Arnold for being honest, owning up to her mistakes and showing that even a Nobel Prize winner can make mistakes. Dr Frances Arnold, who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2018, has retracted an unrelated paper she published last year after it was revealed its results couldn't be proven In a tweet, Dr Arnold wrote: 'It is painful to admit, but important to do so.

The paper, titled 'Site-selective enzymatic C‒H amidation for synthesis of diverse lactams', was published with Dr Zhi-Jun Jia and Inha Cho, who both worked with Dr Arnold at Caltech. It was printed in the prestigious journal Science, but retracted – a scientist's way of taking back what they have written and admitting it was wrong – on January 2. Dr Arnold tweeted that she was 'a bit busy' when the paper was submitted and 'did not do my job well. The work is not the paper which won the Nobel Prize, and the colleagues are not the same people who won that award alongside Dr Arnold. In a notice, the journal Science said efforts to try and reproduce the work of Dr Arnold, Dr Jia and Ms Cho had failed, essentially proving it wrong. The notice added: 'Careful examination of the first author's lab notebook then revealed missing contemporaneous entries and raw data for key experiments. Dr Arnold, who was only the fifth woman ever to win the chemistry Nobel Prize, and now sits on the board of Google's parent company Alphabet, said she was 'totally bummed' that the work had not been accurate. Other researchers commended Dr Arnold for owning up to her mistake. Dr Dominique Hoogland, a King's College London researcher, said: 'This shows that anyone can make an honest mistake' Anmol Kulkarni, a scientist at the Italian Foundation for Cancer Research, tweeted: 'Seeing a Nobel laureate tweet about a paper retraction teaches how important it is for scientist to be honest' Professor Leroy Cronin, from the University of Glasgow, said scientists should feel able to be honest and open about their failures Dr Howard Junca, a scientist in Germany, added: 'A Nobel Prize winner teaches the world a lesson: to face, correct and learn from mistakes with transparency and humility!' Anmol Kulkarni, a scientist at the Italian Foundation for Cancer Research, tweeted: 'Seeing a Nobel laureate tweet about a paper retraction teaches how important it is for scientist to be honest about their data'. Dr Dominique Hoogland, a King's College London researcher, said: 'This shows that anyone can make an honest mistake and acting to correct that is the best response.' Dr Howard Junca, a scientist at Germany's Leibniz Institute, added: 'A Nobel Prize winner teaches the world a lesson: to face, correct and learn from mistakes with transparency and humility!' Word came out yesterday from Frances Arnold of Caltech (via her Twitter account) that she and her co-authors are retracting this paper from Science. After publication of the Report "Site-selective enzymatic C‒H amidation for synthesis of diverse lactams" (1), efforts to reproduce the work showed that the enzymes do not catalyze the reactions with the activities and selectivities claimed. Careful examination of the first author's lab notebook then revealed missing contemporaneous entries and raw data for key experiments. It's of course not good that this work slipped through, but in a follow-up tweet she admits being distracted when this one was submitted (that would be the Nobel award), and that she did not do her job well. It's good to see interesting results from a reliable lab, because that makes you think that the stuff will be more likely to work when you try to reproduce it. (The first link in this post will show that this is far from the first time that a Nobel laureate has retracted a paper!) And even worse, when something like this actually makes it through, sometimes the paper gets retracted and sometimes it doesn't. The numbers are bad enough when you count up outright fraud like this looks to have been – missing raw data, blank notebook entries, etc. But there's a lot of stuff out there with notebooks and data that still just doesn't quite reproduce. The California Institute of Technology's Frances Arnold, who won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on the directed evolution of enzymes, has retracted a paper that appeared in Science in May.