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07 August 2020 10:41

Travis Barker New Zealand IKEA

coronavirus

Blink-182's new song, 'Quarantine', dropped this morning (August 7), after the band shared the single's cover artwork on Twitter yesterday (August 6). Earlier this week, Travis Barker said the band would be releasing the new song ahead of a much-anticipated EP release. "There's a song called 'Quarantine' that's gonna come out really, really soon," he told MTV. It's incredible." Writing on Twitter, Blink wrote: "100 RTs and we release this song Friday." You can see the post below. 100 RTs and we release this song Friday #Quarantine pic.twitter.com/OQRUH4rhr1 — blink-182 (@blink182) August 5, 2020 Barker also revealed his hopes that their long-awaited EP, which Mark Hoppus said last year would feature Lil Uzi Vert and Pharrell Williams, will "be out by the end of summer." The news comes after Goldfinger frontman and producer John Feldmann said earlier this month that Blink-182 are "getting in touch with their roots" during their latest recording sessions.

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The songs we have been working on have been super classic Blink and I can't be more excited." Watch Barker discuss the band's new music below (at the 33:45 mark): Elsewhere in the interview, which saw Barker and new collaborator jxdn come together to talk to MTV, the drummer revealed that he still hates flying following his near death experience in 2008 when the plane he was on crashed in South Carolina. "I still hate flying," he explained, before revealing that another fear he has is regret. It's just a fact. Accomplish your goals. Have goals.

travis barker

Create goals, and just check them off one at a time. Meanwhile, Machine Gun Kelly has only just worked out what the title of Blink-182's 'Take Off Your Pants And Jacket' album means. The post Blink-182 drop timely new track, 'Quarantine' appeared first on NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM. Guests in hotel quarantine have been slammed by police after they were caught spitting out of windows and off balconies. South Australian police were called to the Peppers Hotel in Adelaide on Tuesday where more than 200 repatriated Australians are in quarantine after claims someone had been spitting from the building.

quarantine

A South Australia Police spokesman confirmed to Daily Mail Australia officers were called to the hotel. 'There was one incident and they were spoken to and given an official warning and that was the end of the matter,' the spokesman said. Guests who are in quarantine at the Peppers Hotel in Adelaide (pictured) have been warned by police after reports some were spitting out of windows and off balconies While they weren't charged all guests in the hotel were warned further spitting incidents would result in a fine or prosecution. The 272 passengers had arrived on two separate flights with Air India and Singapore Airlines at 12.30pm on Tuesday, The Advertiser reported. Daily Mail Australia has contacted Peppers Hotel for comment.

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Reports of the spitting came as South Australia took drastic action to contain a 'worrying' coronavirus cluster. Five cases are currently linked to the cluster which has closed the Thebarton Senior College, forcing 94 close contacts into supervised hotel quarantine. More than 1100 other people, including fellow students and staff at the college and the family members of the close contacts, have been asked to isolate at home for 14 days. Reports of the spitting came as South Australia took drastic action to contain a 'worrying' coronavirus cluster linked to the closure of Thebarton Senior College (health offiials pictured in Adeliade) Additionally, South Australian Opposition Leader Peter Malinauskas and his deputy Susan Close are also in home isolation after visiting the college last week. SA reported two new COVID-19 cases on Friday, but both involved people who returned from overseas this week on repatriation flights.

A woman in her 20s and a man in his 50s are in hotel quarantine and are only displaying mild symptoms. Despite the new cases, the state's transition committee left current virus restrictions unchanged after reducing family gatherings to 10 earlier this week and wedding and funerals to 100. A repatriated Australian citizen in quarantine at one of Adelaide's medi hotels has been cautioned after reports of spit coming from a balcony. Hundreds of international arrivals touched down in South Australia on Tuesday aboard an Air India flight from New Delhi and another commercial flight from Singapore. The two planeloads of returning citizens were taken into quarantine at different CBD hotels, including Peppers Hotel on Waymouth Street. Shortly after the repatriated citizens arrived at the hotel, police received a report of an incident where a person was spitting from the hotel's balcony. SA Police says the person was spoken to and given a warning. Contacts quarantined Peppers is one of three hotels being used across the CBD as more than 90 close contacts of a confirmed COVID-19 case which attended Thebarton Senior College are sent into quarantine. The families of those 94 people will also be asked to self-isolate. On top of this, all staff and students at the college - more than 1,100 people - are being forced into self-isolation until Saturday August 15. SA Police officers outside the Ibis Hotel in the Adelaide CBD as close contacts are forced into quarantine. Credit: 7NEWS Two new infections were also identified overnight in returned citizens. Chief Public Health Officer Professor Nicola Spurrier says there is "no cause for concern" over the cases. The woman in her 20s and man in his 50s were tested upon arrival on August 5. There are now 459 COVID-19 cases in South Australia, with 11 of those deemed active. Despite the new infections, Premier Steven Marshall said no additional limits would be put in place for now. "But one of the reasons why there are no changes is we are very impressed with the way people are going to have their COVID test when they develop symptoms," he said. Chinese authorities have sealed off an entire village after one of its residents died of bubonic plague. The death in Suji Xincun village, Inner Mongolia was reported to authorities in Baotou city on Sunday. Yesterday the patient was confirmed to have been suffering from bubonic plague. In an effort to prevent the spread of the plague — especially in the midsts of another global pandemic — authorities completely sealed off Suji Xincun village, meaning no one can get in or out. They also ordered all homes in the village to be disinfected daily. Every resident was tested for the plague and all have tested negative, the statement says. As a precaution, nine close contacts and 26 "secondary" contacts of the dead patient have been quarantined although they also all tested negative. Damao Banner, the district in which the village is located, has been put on a Level 3 alert for plague prevention, the second lowest of a four level system. The public health measure "forbids the hunting and eating of animals that could carry plague and asks the public to report any suspected cases of plague or fever with no clear causes, and to report any sick or dead marmots." Marmots, a type of large ground squirrel eaten in some parts of China and Mongolia, have been linked to past plague outbreaks in the area. The animal is believed to have caused a 1911 plague epidemic which killed about 63,000 people in northeast China. In July, two brothers who had eaten marmot meat tested positive for the plague, leading to a Level 3 alert for Bayunnur, a city in western Inner Mongolia. The Suji Xincun death is the first death confirmed to have been linked to the plague in China this year. Bubonic plague is caused by bacteria transmitted to humans via infected animals and flea bites. (Image: South China Morning Post via Getty Images) The plague has made a comeback in recent years, prompting the World Health Organisation to categorise it as a "re-emerging disease". There are fears that if the disease isn't contained, it could cause devastating mass outbreaks as the world continues to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic.