loading...

31 October 2019 16:40

Trolley Edinburgh Trams Croydon

Croydon tram crash: No charges for driver or operator after seven killed

Image caption Seven people were killed when a tram derailed near to Sandilands tram stop in November 2016 The driver of a tram that crashed in Croydon and killed seven people will not face prosecution for manslaughter. More than 50 people were injured when the tram derailed near Sandilands tram stop in south London in November 2016. Driver Alfred Dorris will not face action due to a lack of evidence, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said. Corporate manslaughter charges will also not be brought against Transport for London (TfL) or the operator Tram Operations Ltd. When it came off the tracks, before dawn and in heavy rain, the tram was travelling at almost four times the line's speed limit. The official report into the crash concluded Mr Dorris, then aged 42, probably dozed off moments before the tram left the tracks.

Image copyright Family Handout Image caption Mark Smith, Dane Chinnery, Phil Seary and Dorota Rynkiewicz (l-r) all died in the crash The seven people killed in the crash were Dane Chinnery, 19, Philip Logan, 52, Philip Seary, 57, Dorota Rynkiewicz, 35, and Robert Huxley, 63, all from New Addington, and Mark Smith, 35 and Donald Collett, 62, both from Croydon. Jenny Hopkins, head of the CPS special crime and counter terrorism division, said investigators "fully recognise the impact this decision will have on families who have lost their loved ones". The CPS said there was no evidence for bringing corporate manslaughter charges as it found no defects in either the tram or the track which could have caused the derailment. Det Supt Gary Richardson, of British Transport Police, said "every scrap of possible evidence has been scrutinised". "We know that this latest update may not be the news that many, including the family members who lost loved ones, had hoped for," he added.

"We have introduced additional safety measures on the tram network and are implementing all of the recommendations made by the Rail Accident Investigation Branch," he said Croydon tram crash: No charges for driver or operator after seven killed Seven people died in the crash on 9 November 2016 No charges will be brought against the driver or operator of a tram which crashed in Croydon in 2016, killing seven people. The driver of the tram will not be charged with gross negligence manslaughter and no charge for corporate manslaughter will be brought against operator Tram Operations Limited, British Transport Police (BTP) said. Seven people were killed and more than 50 injured when the tram, which was carrying 69 passengers, derailed and overturned during the morning rush hour. Detective Superintendent Gary Richardson said: "For the past three years, my team have been working to uncover exactly what happened on the morning of 9 November 2016. "This has involved simulating the circumstances of the derailment, speaking with hundreds of witnesses and collecting thousands of individual pieces of evidence.

He said that although the news may not be what victims' family members had hoped for, there was not enough evidence to bring manslaughter charges. A CPS investigation revealed that it was "most likely" the tram driver fell asleep, or into a "microsleep", shortly before the tram derailed. It also said there was no evidence the driver had done anything which would make him more likely to fall asleep or lose concentration before driving the tram. The Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) said it is "probable" Mr Dorris "temporarily lost awareness" for up to 49 seconds. The tram was travelling at almost four times the speed limit in darkness and heavy rain when it approached a bend and derailed.

"We fully recognise the impact this decision will have on families who have lost their loved ones and we have offered to meet with them to explain our reasons in full," she said. Image: The tram was travelling over the speed limit when it derailed The CPS said it had considered a number of other offences, including: causing death by dangerous or careless driving; wanton and furious driving; endangering the safety of a person on the railway, and corporate manslaughter. The government's Office of Rail and Road said it was still investigating and could bring charges under health and safety legislation. Steve Montgomery, managing director of First Rail, which owns Tram Operations Limited, said: "Our thoughts remain with the families and friends of those who lost their lives, and all those who were injured or affected by this terrible event. The driver of the tram involved in a fatal crash in Croydon in 2016 will not face criminal charges, police have said.

free battle

British Transport Police announced the driver, who was in control of the vehicle when seven people died in the tragedy, will not be charged with gross negligence manslaughter due their not being sufficient evidence to do so. There will also be charge for corporate manslaughter will be brought against Tram Operations Limited and Transport for London. Detective Superintendent Gary Richardson, who led the BTP investigation, said: "For the past three years, my team have been working to uncover exactly what happened on the morning of 9 November 2016. "This has involved simulating the circumstances of the derailment, speaking with hundreds of witnesses and collecting thousands of individual pieces of evidence. "We know that this latest update may not be the news that many, including the family members who lost loved ones, had hoped for." He added that police "are satisfied that every scrap of possible evidence has been scrutinised" and it has been concluded, along with the Crown Prosecution Service, that the threshold to bring charges of manslaughter against the tram driver, TfL and Tram Operations Ltd, has not been met. Police also informed the other survivors and will work with HM Coroner to begin the process of preparing for the inquests of the seven people who lost their lives. DSI Richardson added: "Since November 2016, we've been working alongside the Office of Rail and Road who continue investigate whether Health and Safety legislation was breached during this incident. We will also work with HM Coroner to begin the process of preparing for the inquests of the seven people who lost their lives." Jenny Hopkins, head of the CPS Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division, said: "The Croydon tram crash has had a devastating effect on the local community, especially the families and friends of the seven people who so tragically lost their lives. "The CPS has carefully reviewed all the available material in this case in accordance with the Code for Crown Prosecutors and concluded that the evidence does not support a prosecution of the driver for the offence of gross negligence manslaughter. "We fully recognise the impact this decision will have on families who have lost their loved ones and we have offered to meet with them to explain our reasons in full. The driver of a tram which crashed in Croydon in 2016 killing seven people will face no charges in connection with the incident, the Crown Prosecution Service has announced. The driver, Alfred Dorris, who escaped serious injury in the accident, was thought to have fallen asleep or momentarily lost concentration, shortly before the packed tram overturned at high speed on the morning of November 9, 2016. He was arrested at the scene and questioned on suspicion of manslaughter and an investigation by the Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) said it was "probable" he "temporarily lost awareness" on a straight section of track and may have fallen into a "microsleep" for up to 49 seconds. But prosecutors have now concluded that there is not enough evidence to charge the driver with gross negligence manslaughter or to charge the tram operator with corporate manslaughter. The CPS said they had considered a range of other charges, including causing death by dangerous or careless driving but because trams are not considered to be travelling on roads, the law could not be applied. News that nobody will face charges over the tragedy will come as a blow to the families of those who lost loved ones. The driver involved in the Croydon tram crash will not be charged with gross negligence manslaughter, police said. There will also be no charges for corporate manslaughter brought against Transport for London or operator Tram Operations Ltd, a subsidiary of FirstGroup. British Transport Police (BTP) said "every scrap of possible evidence has been scrutinised". Seven people were killed and 51 others injured when the tram derailed in south-east London on November 9 2016. The driver, Alfred Dorris, of Beckenham, south-east London, was arrested at the scene and questioned on suspicion of manslaughter. The Rail Accident Investigation Branch said it is "probable" he "temporarily lost awareness" on a straight section of track and may have fallen into a "microsleep" for up to 49 seconds. BTP said a dedicated team has been investigating the causes of the crash for nearly three years. The families of those who died have been informed of the decision not to bring charges against the driver or companies involved. Detective Superintendent Gary Richardson, who led the police investigation, said: "We know that this latest update may not be the news that many, including the family members who lost loved ones, had hoped for. "But we are satisfied that every scrap of possible evidence has been scrutinised and, after lengthy consultation with the CPS, it has been concluded that the threshold to bring charges of manslaughter against the tram driver, TfL and Tram Operations Ltd have not been met." He added that BTP will continue to investigate whether health and safety laws were breached during the incident. Jenny Hopkins, head of the special crime and counter terrorism division at the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said it had "carefully reviewed all the available material" before concluding that the evidence "did not support a prosecution". She added: "We fully recognise the impact this decision will have on families who have lost their loved ones and we have offered to meet with them to explain our reasons in full."