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13 November 2019 04:33

Twitch today publicly launched Twitch Studio, its new software designed to help new streamers get started broadcasting.

Twitch Studio, the company’s streaming software for new users, is now in open beta

Twitch Studio — the broadcasting software the live-streaming site debuted back in August to a select group of users — is now open to the public. (Though it is, for the moment, PC-only.) Developed as an easier way to stream and aimed at users who are just starting out on Twitch, the software is both functional and aesthetically appealing. It's for people who have a vague desire to broadcast themselves to the internet but aren't quite sure how to get started. Live-streaming is technically quite difficult: it's live video production, which requires an understanding of the occasionally arcane ecosystem of software and plugins that make it possible. Like every other technologically difficult thing, it also requires a willingness to read a ton of forum comments in search of answers to troubleshoot whatever weird issue you're having.

Twitch Studio is designed to get rid of all that. It's made to automatically detect things like your camera, microphone, and monitor resolution, and it comes with a host of templates and alerts that'll help you seem professional, even if you're not quite sure yet what you're doing. That's great because faking it till you make it is a timeworn strategy for a reason: it works. If you're a Windows user, you can download the beta here. Twitch today publicly launched Twitch Studio, its new software designed to help new streamers get started broadcasting.

The idea behind the app is to make it simple for someone new to the space to get started, by offering a quick setup process and other tools to make the stream both look and sound more professional — even if the streamer doesn't have broadcasting experience. The software, which was only available in closed beta until today, will detect the user's mic, webcam, monitor resolution, bitrate and more through a guided setup process. Streamers can then choose from a variety of starter layouts and overlays that will help them personalize their stream's look-and-feel. Once live on Twitch, the software will also help streamers interact with the online community and viewers, including by way of built-in alerts, an activity feed and integrated Twitch chat. As the company previously explained, many people have thought about streaming but gave up on doing so because the process was too difficult.

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The new software aims to get them over that hurdle of setting up a stream for the first time. As the streamer becomes more knowledgable and capable, they may outgrow their need for Twitch Studio — and that would be fine. The goal is to get them involved with Twitch streaming in the first place, not necessarily keep them on the platform longer-term. Twitch Studio is currently available only on Windows PCs, not Mac, iOS or Android "at this time," Twitch says — a hint that cross-platform support could come further down the road. However, in the near-term, Twitch is working to better integrate the software with other Twitch functionality, as well as roll out tools that make it easier to chat and engage viewers. The launch timing is notable as Twitch has recently lost its biggest streamer, Tyler "Ninja" Blevins, to Microsoft's Mixer. The loss was then followed by the exit of Michael "Shroud" Grzesiek, also to Mixer. Meanwhile, Google's Stadia, which is about to launch on November 19, will make it easy to stream directly to YouTube. Twitch says the new Twitch Studio software is available today, in beta, for anyone on Windows 7 or newer. Fortnite pro Cody 'Clix' Conrod has received a seven-day suspension from Twitch after he streamed on Monday alongside Zayn, a player who has been permanently banned from the service. It's the second time this month a player has been punished for even associating with Zayn, after another Fortnite pro, Khanada, got a three-day suspension last week. Advertisement Zayn has been banned because, after himself being suspended for a different offence, he was caught creating a second account from which he just kept on streaming. Clix and Khanada's suspensions, meanwhile, are because it's against Twitch's rules to have a banned streamer anywhere near your own broadcast, so their similar excuses—that he was muted—weren't good enough for Twitch. It's been a rough month for Conrod; a few weeks back his home was swatted while he was in the middle of a stream.