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30 August 2020 06:35

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Jurassic Coast cliff fall: Warnings after cliff collapse at Hive Beach

A military shell dating from the Second World War thrown up on a west Dorset beach by a storm was detonated in a controlled explosion. A Royal Navy bomb disposal team was called in after the item was discovered at Hive Beach, Burton Bradstock. It led to a temporary closure of the beach with people being kept back from the area. The item, described as a 'projectile', was first spotted last weekend but Coastguards could not find it due to it being covered by sand and debris from high tides. However they were back at the scene yesterday after the recent storm deposited it back on the beach.

It was found close to the spot where the dramatic rockfall happened on Saturday morning. West Bay Coastguard Rescue Team (CRT) were called to investigate the rockfall, and then to assist police with the search for a vulnerable person in the Burton Bradstock area, who was found safe, before going back to Hive when the shell was uncovered and reported to authorities by a National Trust worker. Solent Coastguard was updated, the police were notified and the Coastguard officers were escorted by a member of the National Trust team to the item's location. A West Bay CRT spokesman said: "Photographs, measurements and grid references were taken and sent off to the Royal Navy bomb disposal team for inspection. A cordon was put in place which involved a temporary beach closure and diversion of the cliff top coastal path.

The Royal Navy confirmed that this was likely to be unexploded ordnance and that they were attending the scene. "Coastguards, police and the National Trust then widened the cordon and secured the area pending the arrival of the Royal Navy Team. "On arrival, the Royal Navy inspected the item and confirmed it to be a World War II projectile which required an on scene controlled detonation which they then carried out." The spokesman added: "Once complete, the cordon was released and Coastguard team were stood down after nine hours of continuous incidents. "We want to thank members of the public for their patience and understanding whilst the cordons were in place. Special thanks goes out to the National Trust team, the National Coastwatch Institution and the managers and staff of the Hive Beach Cafe for supporting the emergency services during the incident." Visitors are warned to stay away from cliffs on the Jurassic Coast after a substantial rockfall early on Saturday.

Dorset Council said heavy rain leading up to the bank holiday weekend has made rock faces unstable as they warned people against walking along cliff edges. A crew from Bridport Fire Station attended the scene at Hive Beach near Burton Bradstock along with police. The fall happened at around 6:30am on Saturday morning, the fire station said in an incident report. The fire crew assisted police to check if anyone had been trapped in the rocks and used a thermal imaging camera to check for any casualties around the cliff edge. "We have had a lot of rain and strong stormy seas battering the cliffs making them very unstable," Dorset & Wiltshire Fire & Rescue said in a statement.

View photos A huge section of a cliff fell in the early hours of Saturday morning onto Hive Beach in Dorset in the UK. The popular beach on the Jurassic Coast attracts hundreds of visitors in the summer. According to BBC News, the local council described it as a "huge" rock fall and said recent heavy rain had made cliffs unstable. 【ギャラリー】Cliff fall on Jurassic Coast10 Fire crews with thermal imaging have also been on the scene to check for trapped casualties, but none were found. Beachgoers have been urged to stay away over fears of further collapses in "the dangerous and unpredictable" cliffs.

ES News email The latest headlines in your inbox twice a day Monday - Friday plus breaking news updates Enter your email address Continue Please enter an email address Email address is invalid Fill out this field Email address is invalid You already have an account. Please log in Register with your social account or click here to log in I would like to receive lunchtime headlines Monday - Friday plus breaking news alerts, by email Update newsletter preferences Visitors have been warned to stay away from one of Dorset's most famous beauty spots after a section of cliff crumbled to the ground. Emergency services rushed to the Jurassic Coast after a major rock fall hit a popular beach in the early hours of Saturday. Fire crews used thermal imaging to check for any trapped casualties but nothing was found. The local fire service urged people to keep their distance over the Bank Holiday weekend, saying recent stormy weather had made the cliffs "very unstable." Cynthia Justham, who went for a walk on the beach later in the morning, said visitors seemed oblivious to how "dangerous and unpredictable" the cliffs are. She told the BBC: "Sadly already people are walking right up to it and on it – they don't seem to realise more could fall on top of them at any time and they'd have no time to get out of the way." The incident took place at Hive Beach near the village of Burton Bradstock shortly before 6.30am. In a warning to potential visitors, Bridgeport Fire Station said in a statement: "Please keep away from the cliffs and do not climb over the rock fall. "We have had a lot of rain and strong stormy seas battering the cliffs making them very unstable. "Cliff falls can happen at anytime without warning. "Enjoy the the bank holiday weekend and stay safe." Image copyright Cynthia Justham Image caption The cliff fall happened early on Saturday following heavy rain on the Dorset coast Bank holiday visitors have been warned to stay clear of cliffs on the Jurassic Coast after a large rock fall. The fall happened at Hive Beach near the village of Burton Bradstock shortly before 06:30 BST, Dorset Council said. Fire crews using thermal imaging equipment were called in to check for any trapped casualties but nothing was found. The council described it as a "huge" rock fall and said recent heavy rain had made cliffs unstable. Cynthia Justham, who was walking on the beach later in the morning, said visitors did not appreciate how "dangerous and unpredictable" the cliffs were. "Sadly already people are walking right up to it and on it - they don't seem to realise more could fall on top of them at any time and they'd have no time to get out of the way," she added. In a statement posted on social media, Dorset and Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service urged people to stay away from the cliffs and not climb over the fallen rocks. "We have had a lot of rain and strong stormy seas battering the cliffs making them very unstable," the statement read. "Cliff falls can happen at any time without warning." In 2012, a woman died when she was buried under hundreds of tonnes of rocks following a landslip on the same stretch of beach. Charlotte Blackman, from Derbyshire, her boyfriend and her father were all buried when the 160ft-high (49m) cliff above them collapsed. The men were pulled free but Ms Blackman died.