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24 November 2020 18:34

Utah Monolith Lukas Gage

British director Tristram Shapeero has admitted he was the filmmaker caught insulting Euphoria star Lukas Gage's "tiny apartment" when he thought he was muted during a virtual audition. He has written a public apology to Gage, 25, and praised him for his "quick-witted" response. Footage of the awkward exchange went viral after the US actor shared the clip last week, but did not name the director. Image: Gage shared a clip of the footage on social media Thinking his voice is muted, the filmmaker's voice can be heard saying: "These poor people live in these tiny apartments. Like I'm looking at his, you know, background and he's got his TV..." Gage, smiling, replies: "I know it's a sh***y apartment.

That's why give me this job so I can get a better one." Advertisement Mr Shapeero, a television director who has worked on shows including The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and Brooklyn Nine-Nine, has now confirmed reports identifying him as the director in question. Writing for US entertainment news site Deadline, he offered "a sincere and unvarnished apology" to Gage. "This Zoom audition took place in August, after four months of lockdown," he wrote. "It was emotional to see actors work so hard to win the few parts available and we were deeply moved by the passion of these young people under the extraordinary circumstances. "I was using the word 'poor' in the sense of deserving sympathy, as opposed to any economic judgement.

"My words were being spoken from a genuine place of appreciation for what the actors were having to endure, stuck in confined spaces, finding it within themselves to give a role-winning performance under these conditions.:: Subscribe to the Backstage podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Spreaker "As I say on the video, I'm mortified about what happened. "While I can't put the proverbial toothpaste back in the tube, I move forward from this incident a more empathetic man; a more focused director and I promise, an even better partner to actors from the audition process to the final cut." After the video went viral, Gage received messages of support from a range of stars, including director Judd Apatow, actors Kevin McHale and Hugh Bonneville and actress January Jones. Bonneville tweeted: "Well done for handling that patronising British twerp with such good grace." D irector Tristram Shapeero has come forward to apologise for criticising Euphoria star Lukas Gage's "tiny apartment" while unmuted during a virtual audition. The American actor, 25, shared a video of their exchange on social media last Friday, in which the then-unnamed director can be heard commenting on Gage's Zoom background. Thinking his voice is muted, Mr Shapeero says: "These poor people live in these tiny apartments. Like I'm looking at his, you know, background and he's got his TV." Gage, smiling, replies: "I know it's a shitty apartment. That's why give me this job so I can get a better one." Mr Shapeero, a British television director who has worked on shows including The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and Brooklyn Nine-Nine, has now come forward to offer "a sincere and unvarnished apology". Essential news, delivered daily Email Sign up Sign up Evening Standard would like to keep you informed about offers, events and updates by email, please tick the box if you would like to be contacted Read our full mailing list consent terms here {{message}} {{message}} Writing for Deadline, he confirmed that reports identifying him as the director in question had been correct, before praising Gage for his "quick-witted" response. (Lukas Gage / Getty Images) He said: "This Zoom audition took place in August, after four months of lockdown. A number of my co-workers were also on the auditions which happened over several days. "It was emotional to see actors work so hard to win the few parts available and we were deeply moved by the passion of these young people under the extraordinary circumstances. "I was using the word 'poor' in the sense of deserving sympathy, as opposed to any economic judgment. "My words were being spoken from a genuine place of appreciation for what the actors were having to endure, stuck in confined spaces, finding it within themselves to give a role-winning performance under these conditions. "As I say on the video, I'm mortified about what happened. While I can't put the proverbial toothpaste back in the tube, I move forward from this incident a more empathetic man; a more focused director and I promise, an even better partner to actors from the audition process to the final cut." After the video went viral, Gage received messages of support from director Judd Apatow, actor Kevin McHale and actress January Jones.