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12 November 2020 14:30

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A new rom-com Wild Mountain Thyme set in rural Ireland has been blasted for perpetuating outdated stereotypes, with one outraged critic summing up the feelings of a nation by branding it 'worse than the famine'. The film, set to air next month, released its first trailer on Tuesday to much anticipation, but left disappointed Irish social media users howling at the screen due to its 'clichéd script, outdated costumes and "criminal" accents'. It stars British actress Emily Blunt - with dyed red hair and sporting a selection of shawls last in fashion in the 1800s - and Belfast-born Jamie Dornan as neighbouring farmers struggling to find love with each other. They are joined by Christopher Walken and Jon Hamm, who is the only character speaking in his natural accent as an American visitor, leading audiences to hit out at the rest of the casts' 'terrible West of Ireland brogue. 'Even we think this is a bit much,' tweeted the National Leprechaun Museum of Ireland, while the Dublin Airport Authority added: 'There's fashion police, grammar police, we even have airport police.

Irish Twitter users slam rom-com Wild Mountain Thyme for perpetuating stereotypes

But it wasn't just the dodgy accents which offended viewers, with the rom-com, filmed in County Mayo, also being lambasted for suggesting Irish people all have 'red hair, outdated clothes and love a fight'. It's supposed to showcase the best or rural Ireland, but new rom-com Wild Mountain Thyme (pictured) has left some viewers concerned it's only going to further perpetuate stereotypes Reaction: The film, set to air next month, released its first trailer on Tuesday to much anticipation, but left disappointed Irish social media users howling at the screen due to its 'cliché' accents, outdated costumes and criminal accents' Despite the film's comedic nature, some viewers were not laughing by the end of the first trailer - and instead launched a tirade of criticism, namely in reference to the cast's accents. The storyline of Wild Mountain Thyme Starring Emily Blunt and Jamie Dornan as neighbouring farmers struggling to find love with each other, the pair are also joined by Christopher Walken and Jon Hamm in Wild Mountain Thyme. But Anthony's home life isn't going great, as he is constantly at odds with his father Tony (Walken) who claims: 'You take after John Kelly, and that man was as mad as the full moon, drowned himself.' Despite Anthony having plans to propose to Rosemary eventually, Tony is fed up of waiting for his son to take to his responsibilities and offers his farm to Anthony's American cousin Tommy (Hamm) instead. Telling her he doesn't 'wait' for anything in the first trailer, Rosemary admits she likes that quality in him and the pair visit New York City together. One person jokingly wrote: 'I am only managing about ten seconds of the Wild Mountain Thyme trailer per attempt and my thoughts and prayers are with all actual Irish people at this difficult time.' A fourth viewer said: 'Man those accents are painful to hear and I love Walken in most things.. Even Emily herself admitted that she found the Irish accent a struggle to accomplish in the production, directed by John Patrick Shanley. An Irish American from New York, John, who won a best original screenplay Oscar in 1988 for Moonstruck, adapted the film from his play, Outside Mullingar, which ran on Broadway in 2014. Speaking to People, Emily, 37, who plays Rosemary Muldoon, a headstrong farmer with a yearning for her neighbor, Anthony Reilly (played by Jamie), said: 'I'll admit, I'm sure I had a tougher time with it than [Jamie] did initially. 'And, in Jamie Dornan and Emily Blunt, presents a remarkably realistic depiction, visually at least, of the average Irish man and woman. For some viewers, the 'average Irish man and woman' that Emily Blunt and Jamie Dornan (pictured together) tried to represent was an old-fashioned version Many Twitter users took issue with the outfits worn by the characters, which included Aran cardigans and shawls, while dirty faces and traditional style fishing boats (pictured) were also featured Reaction: Due to the outdated ensembles and items, observers were left puzzled by which period the film was set in, suggesting it looked like the early 1800s However, for some viewers, the 'average Irish man and woman' that Emily and Jamie tried to represent was an old-fashioned version. Due to the outdated ensembles and items, observers were left puzzled by which period the film was set in, suggesting it looked like the early 1800s. But a scene in which Emily's character speaks about freezing her eggs and another where people are in modern-day New York clarifies that the production was actually based in the more recent past. It looks like the Irish lot are wearing clothes from the '70s but then New York is clearly in modern times... It wasn't only the clothes that came under fire following the release of the first trailer - with social media users pointing out how Emily's blonde hair had been changed to red (pictured) It wasn't only the clothes that came under fire following the release of the first trailer - with social media users pointing out how Emily's blonde hair had been changed to red. 'And the red hair myth is next on the agenda', wrote one disappointed viewer. 'I do like Emily Blunt, but we have Irish actresses. A third unimpressed social media user questioned: 'Do the people who cast Wild Mountain Thyme know that there are Irish women who don't have red hair with wispy fringes and who wear knee length skirts to preserve their Catholic guilt whilst they go periwinkle picking by the shore.' Another stereotype viewers suggested the film was wrongly encouraging is the claim that 'half of Ireland loves a fight.' Pictured, Jamie in character Reaction: The joke that Irish people like to fight hit the wrong note with some social media users (pictured) Another stereotype viewers suggested the film was wrongly encouraging is the claim that 'half of Ireland loves a fight.' But during the trailer, we see Rosemary be charmed by Anthony's American cousin Tommy (played by Jon Hamm). But the joke that Irish people like to fight hit the wrong note with some social media users. 'The accents are the least of it,' one viewer (pictured) wrote following the scene, while questioning the production team's outline Jamie's character Anthony is eager to propose to his neighbour Rosemary (played by Emily), but the farmer is certainly nervous. 'The accents are the least of it,' one viewer wrote following the scene. Questioning the production team's outline, she wrote: 'We need to depict modern rural Ireland. From Emily Blunt's Britishness to Christopher Walken (pictured) being from America, some viewers quickly took issue with the lack of Irish actors in the production While one of the leading A-listers in the film, Jamie Dornan, 38, is from Belfast - even admitting he grew up not too far from where the rom-com was shot - the other actors are decidedly less Irish. From Emily Blunt's Britishness to Christopher Walken being from America, some viewers quickly took issue with the lack of Irish actors in the production. American actor Jon Hamm is also in the film but since he plays someone from New York, he escapes any similar criticism.